Dual PA/MPH Program

Title

Recommendations for health care providers when caring for women who have experienced female genital mutilation/cutting.

Poster Number

102

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Masters

Abstract Category

Prevention and Community Health

Keywords

Health, female genital mutilation, toolkit, evaluation

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

In the United States, awareness of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) has increased in recent years due to current events and the increase in FGM/C research. FGM/C is practiced globally but international migration has led to an increase in FGM/C in the Americas, Europe, and Oceania. The CDC estimates that approximately 51,411 women and girls have undergone or are at risk of undergoing FGM/C in the D.C. metropolitan area. With the increase in survivors and girls at risk of FGM/C in the DC metropolitan area there is a need for well-trained health care providers. Many health care providers are not familiar or prepared to care for the physical, emotional, and social complications associated with FGM/C. This project sought to identify some of the best practices and recommendations for health care providers when caring for survivors of FGM/C.

Methods: Health care providers (physicians, mental health professionals, counselors, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives) in the D.C metropolitan area with experience caring for survivors of FGM/C, were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. The interviews were conducted to ascertain information about the health care providers experience working with survivors of FGM/C, challenges they experiences working with survivors, best practices when caring for survivors, recommendations for other health care providers, and gaps in health care provider knowledge and training.

Results: A total of 25 interviews with health care providers were completed and reviewed for recommendations. The health care providers identified recommendations for formal trainings, medical care, communication, and resources to be included in a toolkit available to health care providers. The recommendations for trainings included training for practicing health care providers as well as health care students. The medical care recommendations were provided by health care providers practicing in a variety of specialties, therefore some of the recommendations are specific to certain specialties and others for general care. Recommendations for communication included both verbal and non-verbal recommendations. The toolkit recommendations included information about the practice FGM/C, printable materials, interactive materials, and referral lists.

Discussion: The recommendations obtained from the interviews provided a substantial list of care techniques, tools, and best practices for all health care providers regardless of whether or not they have encountered survivors of FGM/C in their practice. These recommendations will be helpful in creating a toolkit for health care providers as well as advocating for more training opportunities on the subject of caring for women who have experienced FGM/C.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Recommendations for health care providers when caring for women who have experienced female genital mutilation/cutting.

In the United States, awareness of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) has increased in recent years due to current events and the increase in FGM/C research. FGM/C is practiced globally but international migration has led to an increase in FGM/C in the Americas, Europe, and Oceania. The CDC estimates that approximately 51,411 women and girls have undergone or are at risk of undergoing FGM/C in the D.C. metropolitan area. With the increase in survivors and girls at risk of FGM/C in the DC metropolitan area there is a need for well-trained health care providers. Many health care providers are not familiar or prepared to care for the physical, emotional, and social complications associated with FGM/C. This project sought to identify some of the best practices and recommendations for health care providers when caring for survivors of FGM/C.

Methods: Health care providers (physicians, mental health professionals, counselors, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives) in the D.C metropolitan area with experience caring for survivors of FGM/C, were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. The interviews were conducted to ascertain information about the health care providers experience working with survivors of FGM/C, challenges they experiences working with survivors, best practices when caring for survivors, recommendations for other health care providers, and gaps in health care provider knowledge and training.

Results: A total of 25 interviews with health care providers were completed and reviewed for recommendations. The health care providers identified recommendations for formal trainings, medical care, communication, and resources to be included in a toolkit available to health care providers. The recommendations for trainings included training for practicing health care providers as well as health care students. The medical care recommendations were provided by health care providers practicing in a variety of specialties, therefore some of the recommendations are specific to certain specialties and others for general care. Recommendations for communication included both verbal and non-verbal recommendations. The toolkit recommendations included information about the practice FGM/C, printable materials, interactive materials, and referral lists.

Discussion: The recommendations obtained from the interviews provided a substantial list of care techniques, tools, and best practices for all health care providers regardless of whether or not they have encountered survivors of FGM/C in their practice. These recommendations will be helpful in creating a toolkit for health care providers as well as advocating for more training opportunities on the subject of caring for women who have experienced FGM/C.