Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Poster Number

108

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Masters

Abstract Category

Prevention and Community Health

Keywords

physical activity, stress, stress management, young adults

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Background: Physical activity and stress are common factors that affect the health and wellness of young adults worldwide. Higher levels of stress in students can lead to increased blood pressure and decreased immune system defenses. Previous studies have found that students who report more physical activity also report lower levels of stress. Perceived stress is subjective, however, and therefore the amount of physical activity that affects stress levels could vary. Additionally, extensive research has yet to be conducted on the different coping mechanisms that physically active students use to relieve stress. These mechanisms may include physical activity as a stress reliever, as well as more passive methods, such as sleeping, eating unhealthy foods, and watching television. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between physical activity, stress levels, and active and passive stress management mechanisms. Through this research we will first examine how stress levels among young adults who are overweight and obese compare to a normative sample. The primary research question we hope to answer is whether young adults ages 18-35 years who are more physically active cope with stress using active mechanisms more than those who are less physically active? Two supplemental questions to follow include: (1) Do physically active undergraduate students manage stress differently than physically active graduate students, and (2) Do physically active males manage stress differently than physically active females? Methods: Data analysis will be conducted using baseline measurements collected for the Healthy Body Healthy U Study. Data from Actigraphs, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Stress Management questionnaire, as well as demographic data will be included.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

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Presented at GW Annual Research Days 2018.

Available for download on Saturday, May 04, 2019

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Active and Passive Stress Management Mechanisms in Physically Active Young Adults

Background: Physical activity and stress are common factors that affect the health and wellness of young adults worldwide. Higher levels of stress in students can lead to increased blood pressure and decreased immune system defenses. Previous studies have found that students who report more physical activity also report lower levels of stress. Perceived stress is subjective, however, and therefore the amount of physical activity that affects stress levels could vary. Additionally, extensive research has yet to be conducted on the different coping mechanisms that physically active students use to relieve stress. These mechanisms may include physical activity as a stress reliever, as well as more passive methods, such as sleeping, eating unhealthy foods, and watching television. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between physical activity, stress levels, and active and passive stress management mechanisms. Through this research we will first examine how stress levels among young adults who are overweight and obese compare to a normative sample. The primary research question we hope to answer is whether young adults ages 18-35 years who are more physically active cope with stress using active mechanisms more than those who are less physically active? Two supplemental questions to follow include: (1) Do physically active undergraduate students manage stress differently than physically active graduate students, and (2) Do physically active males manage stress differently than physically active females? Methods: Data analysis will be conducted using baseline measurements collected for the Healthy Body Healthy U Study. Data from Actigraphs, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Stress Management questionnaire, as well as demographic data will be included.