School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

An Updated Institutional Review of Mastectomy and Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Rates

Document Type

Poster

Keywords

breast cancer; mastectomy; prophylactic mastectomy

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

An Updated Institutional Review of Mastectomy and Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Rates_x000D_ Anita Sambamurty, M.P.H., Cecilia Rossi, Christine Teal, M.D., Anita McSwain, M.D., M.P.H., Claire Edwards M.D.

Breast conservation (BCT) followed by radiation therapy has been shown to be as effective for long term survival of breast cancer as mastectomies, and is considered standard of care for patients who are candidates. However, patients are increasingly electing to have mastectomies with contralateral prophylactic mastectomies (CPM). A previous study from our institution observed factors that influenced patients to choose mastectomies over BCT between 2002 and 2009. The purpose of the current study was to observe mastectomy rates in our institution over the past 2 years and to evaluate factors for BCT-eligible patients who elected to have mastectomies with and without CPM.

A retrospective analysis was performed for 201 mastectomy surgeries among females between September 2013 and August 2015 at The George Washington University Breast Care Center. Patients who were eligible for BCT were compared to patients not eligible for BCT. Rates of CPM were also compared among those who were and were not eligible for BCT. Chi-squared test of independence was used to evaluate statistical significance.

Of 201 mastectomies performed, 34 were prophylactic and 167 were for cancer. Of the 167 for cancer, 97 (58.1%) were not eligible for BCT and 70 (41.9%) were eligible for BCT. Of mastectomy patients who were BCT-eligible, 49 (70.0%) also elected to have CPM (p

Mastectomy and CPM rates have been increasing at our institution, which has been observed by other authors. Preoperative diagnosis of invasive carcinoma, family and personal history of disease, age and race were found to be associated with mastectomy and CPM in this study. However, more studies observing BCT-eligible patients who elected mastectomy versus BCT are required to further evaluate the factors that impact patients’ choices for surgical management.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

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Poster to be presented at GW Annual Research Day 2017.

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An Updated Institutional Review of Mastectomy and Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Rates

An Updated Institutional Review of Mastectomy and Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Rates_x000D_ Anita Sambamurty, M.P.H., Cecilia Rossi, Christine Teal, M.D., Anita McSwain, M.D., M.P.H., Claire Edwards M.D.

Breast conservation (BCT) followed by radiation therapy has been shown to be as effective for long term survival of breast cancer as mastectomies, and is considered standard of care for patients who are candidates. However, patients are increasingly electing to have mastectomies with contralateral prophylactic mastectomies (CPM). A previous study from our institution observed factors that influenced patients to choose mastectomies over BCT between 2002 and 2009. The purpose of the current study was to observe mastectomy rates in our institution over the past 2 years and to evaluate factors for BCT-eligible patients who elected to have mastectomies with and without CPM.

A retrospective analysis was performed for 201 mastectomy surgeries among females between September 2013 and August 2015 at The George Washington University Breast Care Center. Patients who were eligible for BCT were compared to patients not eligible for BCT. Rates of CPM were also compared among those who were and were not eligible for BCT. Chi-squared test of independence was used to evaluate statistical significance.

Of 201 mastectomies performed, 34 were prophylactic and 167 were for cancer. Of the 167 for cancer, 97 (58.1%) were not eligible for BCT and 70 (41.9%) were eligible for BCT. Of mastectomy patients who were BCT-eligible, 49 (70.0%) also elected to have CPM (p

Mastectomy and CPM rates have been increasing at our institution, which has been observed by other authors. Preoperative diagnosis of invasive carcinoma, family and personal history of disease, age and race were found to be associated with mastectomy and CPM in this study. However, more studies observing BCT-eligible patients who elected mastectomy versus BCT are required to further evaluate the factors that impact patients’ choices for surgical management.