Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Examining the Medicaid IMD Exclusion and its Implication in Mental Health Outcomes

Poster Number

84

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Masters

Abstract Category

Health Policy and Management

Keywords

Mental Health; Medicaid; Policy; Health Reform; Health Care

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Recent political unrest regarding the Medicaid Institutions for Mental Disease (IMD) Exclusion has resurrected the provision among both policymakers and stakeholders as a gap in coverage for many Americans. This study sought to find connections between access to inpatient and community-based mental health services and patient outcomes. Data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Agency Uniform Reporting System was analyzed to identify significant findings among state spending on inpatient mental health services, state spending on ambulatory and community services, rates of Serious Mental Illness among adults aged 21-64, and rates of homelessness. It was found that states spending more on both inpatient and ambulatory and community mental health services have higher rates of SMI/1000 adults aged 21-64, and there is no significant relationship between state spending on both inpatient and ambulatory and community mental health services and rates of homelessness. This signals that simply increasing funding among existing programs or eliminating the Medicaid IMD Exclusion may not be a complete solution for improving mental health outcomes for adults aged 21-64 with SMI.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

To be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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Examining the Medicaid IMD Exclusion and its Implication in Mental Health Outcomes

Recent political unrest regarding the Medicaid Institutions for Mental Disease (IMD) Exclusion has resurrected the provision among both policymakers and stakeholders as a gap in coverage for many Americans. This study sought to find connections between access to inpatient and community-based mental health services and patient outcomes. Data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Agency Uniform Reporting System was analyzed to identify significant findings among state spending on inpatient mental health services, state spending on ambulatory and community services, rates of Serious Mental Illness among adults aged 21-64, and rates of homelessness. It was found that states spending more on both inpatient and ambulatory and community mental health services have higher rates of SMI/1000 adults aged 21-64, and there is no significant relationship between state spending on both inpatient and ambulatory and community mental health services and rates of homelessness. This signals that simply increasing funding among existing programs or eliminating the Medicaid IMD Exclusion may not be a complete solution for improving mental health outcomes for adults aged 21-64 with SMI.