Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Involvement of Romantic Partners in Prostate Cancer Patients' Treatment Decision

Poster Number

107

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Masters

Abstract Category

Prevention and Community Health

Keywords

prostate cancer; treatment; partner; support

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Purpose: The central aim of this study was to identify ways prostate cancer (PCa) patients' female romantic partners are involved in their treatment decision and how partners might influence the treatment decision.

Methods: Twenty-five men (21 partnered/married, 23 White Non-Hispanic, mean age = 66) with clinically localized PCa were interviewed by telephone about their treatment decision-making experiences. The semi-structured interviews were transcribed verbatim and transcripts were coded by three or more coders using a codebook generated through an open-coding process. Discrepancies were resolved via discussion.

Results/ Discussion: Unless the relationship was strained, partners were the primary support person involved in men's treatment decision. Men described partners' involvement as collaborative, active, or passive. Most men expressed satisfaction with the support they received. The most common way partners were involved was by seeking information about the disease and treatment options from sources such as the Internet and by asking questions at physician consultations. In some cases, partners urged men to choose more aggressive treatment. Partners also provided tangible and emotional support.

Conclusion: Contrary to earlier studies, most of the men reported that their wives/ partners were involved in the PCa treatment decision process, and believed their support was helpful. We also identified potential explanations for why married men have relatively better survival rates for PCa, including partner support for aggressive treatment. Also, partner support may reduce logistical burdens of aggressive treatment and adherence to follow-up protocols.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

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Comments

To be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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Involvement of Romantic Partners in Prostate Cancer Patients' Treatment Decision

Purpose: The central aim of this study was to identify ways prostate cancer (PCa) patients' female romantic partners are involved in their treatment decision and how partners might influence the treatment decision.

Methods: Twenty-five men (21 partnered/married, 23 White Non-Hispanic, mean age = 66) with clinically localized PCa were interviewed by telephone about their treatment decision-making experiences. The semi-structured interviews were transcribed verbatim and transcripts were coded by three or more coders using a codebook generated through an open-coding process. Discrepancies were resolved via discussion.

Results/ Discussion: Unless the relationship was strained, partners were the primary support person involved in men's treatment decision. Men described partners' involvement as collaborative, active, or passive. Most men expressed satisfaction with the support they received. The most common way partners were involved was by seeking information about the disease and treatment options from sources such as the Internet and by asking questions at physician consultations. In some cases, partners urged men to choose more aggressive treatment. Partners also provided tangible and emotional support.

Conclusion: Contrary to earlier studies, most of the men reported that their wives/ partners were involved in the PCa treatment decision process, and believed their support was helpful. We also identified potential explanations for why married men have relatively better survival rates for PCa, including partner support for aggressive treatment. Also, partner support may reduce logistical burdens of aggressive treatment and adherence to follow-up protocols.