Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Integrated Health Behavior Models Illustrate How Positive Attitudes and Low Risk Perceptions Drive Young Adult E-Cigarette Use

Poster Number

97

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Doctoral

Abstract Category

Prevention and Community Health

Keywords

young adults; e-cigarettes; attitude; norm; risk perception

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Given increasing rates of e-cigarette use among young adults, research is needed on the attitudes and beliefs that drive use among this age group. Tobacco control approaches used to prevent cigarette smoking may not work as effectively for preventing e-cigarette use. To address this research gap, the present study applied the Integrated Behavior Model (IBM) encompassing the affect heuristic theory to examine the individual-level determinants (i.e., attitude, perceived norm, personal agency, intention, and e-cigarette risk perception) of young adults' e-cigarette use. The 2013-2014 Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study Wave 1 baseline adult dataset consisted of 9,112 young adults (ages 18-24). A total of 3,887 (42.7%) reported ever having used an e-cigarette even one or two times, and reported now using e-cigarettes every day (n=160), some days (n=947), or not at all/non-users (2,780). Structural equation modeling (SEM) indicated that both the affect heuristic theory and constructs adapted from the IBM were significant drivers of e-cigarette use among young adults. The final structural model demonstrated acceptable fit (CFI = 0.935; TLI = 0.925; RMSEA = 0.024, 90% CI: 0.022-0.026). As expected for the IBM, as young adults’ positive feelings, perceived benefits, and normative beliefs of e-cigarettes increased, their intention to quit e-cigarettes decreased; which increased the likelihood of currently using e-cigarettes. As perceived benefit and positive feelings increased, young adults' risk perceptions decreased resulting in a higher likelihood of using the device. These findings suggest that future communication, educational, and policy strategies to prevent e-cigarette use among young adults should highlight the health risk of e-cigarettes to address the high perceived benefits and low risk perceptions reported by young adults in this study.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

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Comments

Poster to be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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Integrated Health Behavior Models Illustrate How Positive Attitudes and Low Risk Perceptions Drive Young Adult E-Cigarette Use

Given increasing rates of e-cigarette use among young adults, research is needed on the attitudes and beliefs that drive use among this age group. Tobacco control approaches used to prevent cigarette smoking may not work as effectively for preventing e-cigarette use. To address this research gap, the present study applied the Integrated Behavior Model (IBM) encompassing the affect heuristic theory to examine the individual-level determinants (i.e., attitude, perceived norm, personal agency, intention, and e-cigarette risk perception) of young adults' e-cigarette use. The 2013-2014 Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study Wave 1 baseline adult dataset consisted of 9,112 young adults (ages 18-24). A total of 3,887 (42.7%) reported ever having used an e-cigarette even one or two times, and reported now using e-cigarettes every day (n=160), some days (n=947), or not at all/non-users (2,780). Structural equation modeling (SEM) indicated that both the affect heuristic theory and constructs adapted from the IBM were significant drivers of e-cigarette use among young adults. The final structural model demonstrated acceptable fit (CFI = 0.935; TLI = 0.925; RMSEA = 0.024, 90% CI: 0.022-0.026). As expected for the IBM, as young adults’ positive feelings, perceived benefits, and normative beliefs of e-cigarettes increased, their intention to quit e-cigarettes decreased; which increased the likelihood of currently using e-cigarettes. As perceived benefit and positive feelings increased, young adults' risk perceptions decreased resulting in a higher likelihood of using the device. These findings suggest that future communication, educational, and policy strategies to prevent e-cigarette use among young adults should highlight the health risk of e-cigarettes to address the high perceived benefits and low risk perceptions reported by young adults in this study.