Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Poster Number

88

Document Type

Poster

Status

Recent Alumni

Abstract Category

Prevention and Community Health

Keywords

Electronic cigarette; smoking cessation; mhealth; pregnancy; women's health

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Background: The use of electronic cigarettes is a rapidly expanding phenomenon. Currently, there is a scarcity of data to help guide decisions regarding the potential harm and benefits of e-cigarettes. This study examines whether pregnant smokers who used e-cigarettes are more likely to quit smoking than those who had never used e-cigarettes.

Methods: Data were drawn from the Quit4Baby study, a text-message-based smoking cessation randomized controlled trial. The sample was comprised of 481 participants with complete follow-up data at 1 month follow-up. Linear and logistics regression models to control for confounds were conducted to evaluate the association between e-cigarette use and smoking cessation outcomes.

Results: 21.83% of pregnant smokers reported past 30-day use of e-cigarette at baseline or 1 month. E-cigarette users differed from non-users on baseline characteristics including Fagerstrom score, and self-efficacy to quit smoking. At 1 month follow-up, a larger decline in cigarette smoked per day was observed in e-cigarette users (mean decline = 3.95 cigarettes/day) compared to non-users (mean decline = 3.16 cigarettes/day); however, it was not statistically significant. Compared with pregnant smokers who never used e-cigarettes during pregnancy, smokers who ever used e-cigarettes were less likely to quit smoking for 30 days at 1 month follow-up after controlling for intervention effect (AOR=0.466; 95% CI = 0.191, 1.135; p = 0.09) and approached the level of significance.

Conclusions: Pregnant smokers who have used e-cigarettes during pregnancy may be at increased risk for not being able to quit smoking. Longer-term cohort studies need to be conducted to confirm findings and future studies should employ better measures of patterns of and reasons for e-cigarette use, and frequency of usage.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

Poster presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

This poster is the winner of the People's Choice Award.

 

E-Cigarettes and Smoking Cessation Among Pregnant Women: Insights From a Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial

Background: The use of electronic cigarettes is a rapidly expanding phenomenon. Currently, there is a scarcity of data to help guide decisions regarding the potential harm and benefits of e-cigarettes. This study examines whether pregnant smokers who used e-cigarettes are more likely to quit smoking than those who had never used e-cigarettes.

Methods: Data were drawn from the Quit4Baby study, a text-message-based smoking cessation randomized controlled trial. The sample was comprised of 481 participants with complete follow-up data at 1 month follow-up. Linear and logistics regression models to control for confounds were conducted to evaluate the association between e-cigarette use and smoking cessation outcomes.

Results: 21.83% of pregnant smokers reported past 30-day use of e-cigarette at baseline or 1 month. E-cigarette users differed from non-users on baseline characteristics including Fagerstrom score, and self-efficacy to quit smoking. At 1 month follow-up, a larger decline in cigarette smoked per day was observed in e-cigarette users (mean decline = 3.95 cigarettes/day) compared to non-users (mean decline = 3.16 cigarettes/day); however, it was not statistically significant. Compared with pregnant smokers who never used e-cigarettes during pregnancy, smokers who ever used e-cigarettes were less likely to quit smoking for 30 days at 1 month follow-up after controlling for intervention effect (AOR=0.466; 95% CI = 0.191, 1.135; p = 0.09) and approached the level of significance.

Conclusions: Pregnant smokers who have used e-cigarettes during pregnancy may be at increased risk for not being able to quit smoking. Longer-term cohort studies need to be conducted to confirm findings and future studies should employ better measures of patterns of and reasons for e-cigarette use, and frequency of usage.

 

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