School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

The Impact of Obesity on Patient Reported Outcomes following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

Poster Number

150

Document Type

Poster

Publication Date

3-2016

Abstract

Abstract:

Purpose/Objective(s): The relationship between obesity (Body Mass Index > 30 kg/m2) and quality of life (QoL) following prostate cancer (PCa) radiation therapy (RT) is unknown. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is able to track moving targets and deliver highly conformal radiation therapy with high accuracy in a non-coplanar manner. Excess abdominal fat may compromise the precise delivery of such beams, putting surrounding organs at risk for greater radiation exposure. This study compares QoL in obese and non-obese PCa patients after SBRT.

Materials/Methods: Between February 2008 and April 2012, 88 obese and 178 non-obese patients with PCa where treated with SBRT at Georgetown University Hospital. Quality of life was assessed via the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-26 at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after 5-fraction delivery of 35-36.25 Gy with the CyberKnife. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) where excluded from this analysis.

Results: Pre-treatment characteristics of obese and non-obese patient groups were similar. Urinary and bowel function and bother scores between BMI groups were comparable at baseline and subsequent follow-ups. Sexual function was also similar at all time points between both groups. At 24 months, obese men experienced borderline clinically significant decrease in sexual function and greater sexual bother compared to non-obese patients. Fatigue and self-perceived weight change scores were significantly lower in obese patients compared to in non-obese patients at 18 months.

Conclusion: Obese men undergoing SBRT for prostate cancer report comparable quality of life to that reported by non-obese men after PCa-SBRT, within 24 months of treatment. Longer follow-up is required to determine the impact of obesity on cancer control.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at: GW Research Days 2016

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

The Impact of Obesity on Patient Reported Outcomes following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

Abstract:

Purpose/Objective(s): The relationship between obesity (Body Mass Index > 30 kg/m2) and quality of life (QoL) following prostate cancer (PCa) radiation therapy (RT) is unknown. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is able to track moving targets and deliver highly conformal radiation therapy with high accuracy in a non-coplanar manner. Excess abdominal fat may compromise the precise delivery of such beams, putting surrounding organs at risk for greater radiation exposure. This study compares QoL in obese and non-obese PCa patients after SBRT.

Materials/Methods: Between February 2008 and April 2012, 88 obese and 178 non-obese patients with PCa where treated with SBRT at Georgetown University Hospital. Quality of life was assessed via the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-26 at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after 5-fraction delivery of 35-36.25 Gy with the CyberKnife. Patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) where excluded from this analysis.

Results: Pre-treatment characteristics of obese and non-obese patient groups were similar. Urinary and bowel function and bother scores between BMI groups were comparable at baseline and subsequent follow-ups. Sexual function was also similar at all time points between both groups. At 24 months, obese men experienced borderline clinically significant decrease in sexual function and greater sexual bother compared to non-obese patients. Fatigue and self-perceived weight change scores were significantly lower in obese patients compared to in non-obese patients at 18 months.

Conclusion: Obese men undergoing SBRT for prostate cancer report comparable quality of life to that reported by non-obese men after PCa-SBRT, within 24 months of treatment. Longer follow-up is required to determine the impact of obesity on cancer control.