Title

The American Orthopaedic Association’s Own the Bone® database: a national quality improvement project for the treatment of bone health in fragility fracture patients

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

9-1-2018

Journal

Osteoporosis International

Volume

29

Issue

9

DOI

10.1007/s00198-018-4585-7

Keywords

Bone mineral density; Fragility fracture; Hip fracture; Osteopenia; Osteoporosis; Spine fracture

Abstract

© 2018, International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation. Summary: The American Orthopaedic Association initiated the Own the Bone (OTB) quality improvement program in 2009. Herein we show that the data collected through this program is similar to that collected in other large studies. Thus, the OTB registry functions as an externally valid cohort for studying fragility fracture patients. Introduction: The American Orthopedic Association initiated the Own the Bone (OTB) quality improvement program in 2009 to improve secondary prevention of fragility fractures. In this study, we present a summary of the data collected by the OTB program and compare it to data from other large fragility fracture registries with an aim to externally validate the OTB registry. Methods: The OTB registry contained 35,038 unique cases of fragility fracture as of September, 2016. We report the demographics, presenting fracture characteristics, past fracture history, and bone mineral density (BMD) data and compare these to data from large fragility fracture studies across the world. Results: Seventy-three percent of the patients in the OTB registry were female, Caucasian, and post-menopausal. In 54.4% of cases, patients had a hip fracture; spine fractures were the second most common fracture type occurring in 11.1% of patients. Thirty-four percent of the patients had a past history of fragility fracture, and the most common sites were the spine and hip. The average femoral neck T-score was − 2.06. When compared to other studies, the OTB database showed similar findings with regard to patient age, gender, race, BMI, BMD profile, prior fracture history, and family history of fragility fractures. Conclusion: OTB is the first and largest multi-center voluntary fragility fracture registry in the USA. The data collected through the OTB program is comparable to that collected in international studies. Thus, the OTB registry functions as an externally valid cohort for further studies assessing the clinical characteristics, interventions, and outcomes achieved in patients who present with a fragility fracture in the USA.

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