Title

Physical Activity and Cardiometabolic Risk Factor Clustering in Young Adults with Obesity

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

5-1-2020

Journal

Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

Volume

52

Issue

5

DOI

10.1249/MSS.0000000000002214

Keywords

BODY WEIGHT; CHRONIC DISEASE; METABOLIC SYNDROME; PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Abstract

Introduction There is a paucity of information on the clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors in young adults and how this clustering may vary based on whether or not they perform sufficient levels of physical activity. Methods We analyzed baseline data from 346 young adults (23.3 ± 4.4 yr) participating in the Healthy Body Healthy U clinical trial from 2015 to 2018. Cardiometabolic risk factors were measured according to standard procedures and moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) was determined by accelerometry. A cardiometabolic clustering score (ranging from 0 to 5) was created from five biomarkers according to whether or not a standard clinical risk cut point was exceeded (0, no; 1, yes): abdominal circumference (>102 cm (men) or >88 cm (women)), hemoglobin A1c (≥5.7%), HDL cholesterol (<40 mg·dL-1 (men) or <50 mg·dL-1 (women)), systolic blood pressure (≥130 mm Hg), and diastolic blood pressure (≥85 mm Hg). Cardiometabolic dysregulation (CD) was defined as a cardiometabolic clustering score ≥3. Multiple logistic regression determined the independent association between level of MVPA and CD, while adjusting for sex, race/ethnicity, sedentary time, and smoking. Results The prevalence of CD was 18% (22% in men, 17% in women). We observed a nonlinear graded association between MVPA and CD. Participants performing 150-300 min·wk-1 of MVPA significantly lowered their odds of CD by 66% (odds ratio, 0.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.75), whereas those exceeding 300 min·wk-1 lowered their odds by 61% (odds ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.86) compared with those performing <150 min·wk-1, independent of obesity and the other covariables. Conclusion Recommended levels of moderate-intensity physical activity is significantly associated with lower odds of CD and thus may prevent or diminish the need for expensive pharmaceutical treatment over the remainder of the life-span.

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