School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Outpatient parotidectomy: a safe and feasible alternative to inpatient surgery

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Clinical Specialties

Keywords

Outpatient, parotid, parotidectomy

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Parotidectomy has traditionally been regarded as an inpatient procedure. Recent literature suggests that outpatient head and neck surgery is just as safe as inpatient surgery, may decrease costs, and improve patient satisfaction. Although data exists for a wide range of outpatient surgical procedures, there is limited recent literature examining the viability of outpatient parotidectomy. A cohort of patients who underwent parotidectomy over a 7-year period was retrospectively studied in a single institution. Patients were divided by inpatient or outpatient status. Complication and readmission rates for both outpatient and inpatient groups were tabulated. Complications that were analyzed included infection, seroma, sialocele, salivary fistula, hematoma, and flap necrosis. Over a period of 7 years, a total of 144 patients had available data for analysis. 9 of the 144 patients had complications (6.3%). 7 of 98 (7.1%) outpatients and 2 of 46 (4.3%) inpatients had complications. The most common complication among the entire cohort was sialocele (2.08%). Among the inpatient group, complications consisted of wound infection requiring readmission, hematoma, and facial nerve injury. There was no statistically significant difference in overall complication rate between the two groups (p=0.518). Our results suggest that outcomes are comparable between inpatient and outpatient parotidectomy groups. Outpatient parotidectomy appears to be a safe and viable alternative.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Outpatient parotidectomy: a safe and feasible alternative to inpatient surgery

Parotidectomy has traditionally been regarded as an inpatient procedure. Recent literature suggests that outpatient head and neck surgery is just as safe as inpatient surgery, may decrease costs, and improve patient satisfaction. Although data exists for a wide range of outpatient surgical procedures, there is limited recent literature examining the viability of outpatient parotidectomy. A cohort of patients who underwent parotidectomy over a 7-year period was retrospectively studied in a single institution. Patients were divided by inpatient or outpatient status. Complication and readmission rates for both outpatient and inpatient groups were tabulated. Complications that were analyzed included infection, seroma, sialocele, salivary fistula, hematoma, and flap necrosis. Over a period of 7 years, a total of 144 patients had available data for analysis. 9 of the 144 patients had complications (6.3%). 7 of 98 (7.1%) outpatients and 2 of 46 (4.3%) inpatients had complications. The most common complication among the entire cohort was sialocele (2.08%). Among the inpatient group, complications consisted of wound infection requiring readmission, hematoma, and facial nerve injury. There was no statistically significant difference in overall complication rate between the two groups (p=0.518). Our results suggest that outcomes are comparable between inpatient and outpatient parotidectomy groups. Outpatient parotidectomy appears to be a safe and viable alternative.