School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Development of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Psoriasis Patients

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Clinical Specialties

Keywords

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Psoriasis, Stress, Integrative, Multidisciplinary

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

This study initially sought to provide a qualitative basis for the development of a protocol on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) by utilizing patient focus groups. A protocol on utilizing CBT as adjunct therapy in psoriasis treatment would then be used as a basis for further studies as a standard for alternative therapies in psoriasis. Due to time restrictions, patients were interviewed on a one-to-one basis and asked questions based on past and current treatment, willingness to attend CBT sessions for adjunct treatment, and whether or not they believed stress played a major factor in psoriasis flares. At its conclusion, results of the interview period demonstrated that the majority of patients interviewed stated that they believed stress was an integral player in their psoriasis flares, and most of the patients would be willing to try CBT therapy as adjunct to their current psoriasis treatment. None of the patients who were interviewed had formal therapy experience. Because of the small sample size, further interviews are needed to conduct a more comprehensive and accurate investigation and development of a manual for use of CBT in adjunct psoriasis treatment. Patients have valuable insight into their own disease process, and since psoriasis is not completely understood, this information may prove helpful for development adjunct and alternative non-medical therapies for the disease.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Development of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Psoriasis Patients

This study initially sought to provide a qualitative basis for the development of a protocol on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) by utilizing patient focus groups. A protocol on utilizing CBT as adjunct therapy in psoriasis treatment would then be used as a basis for further studies as a standard for alternative therapies in psoriasis. Due to time restrictions, patients were interviewed on a one-to-one basis and asked questions based on past and current treatment, willingness to attend CBT sessions for adjunct treatment, and whether or not they believed stress played a major factor in psoriasis flares. At its conclusion, results of the interview period demonstrated that the majority of patients interviewed stated that they believed stress was an integral player in their psoriasis flares, and most of the patients would be willing to try CBT therapy as adjunct to their current psoriasis treatment. None of the patients who were interviewed had formal therapy experience. Because of the small sample size, further interviews are needed to conduct a more comprehensive and accurate investigation and development of a manual for use of CBT in adjunct psoriasis treatment. Patients have valuable insight into their own disease process, and since psoriasis is not completely understood, this information may prove helpful for development adjunct and alternative non-medical therapies for the disease.