Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Preventing Unintended Pregnancies in Washington D.C.: What Factors are Related to Effective Contraceptive Use

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Prevention and Community Health

Keywords

Sexual behavior, sexual health, unintended pregnancy, family planning

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

In 2011, approximately 2.8 million pregnancies in the United States were unintended, which equates to about 45% of all pregnancies, and in 2010, 62% of all pregnancies in D.C. were unintended. Since little is known about effective contraceptive use among sexually active women in D.C., this study examined sociodemographics, and sexual and reproductive health knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to effective contraceptive use among this population. Between November 2017 and April 2018, a purposive non-random stratified sample of women ages 15-29 were recruited across all eight wards in the District of Columbia (N = 1,573). This study will inform future family planning interventions and fill gaps in the evidence base surrounding utilization of effective methods of contraception among adolescents and women in the District of Columbia.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Preventing Unintended Pregnancies in Washington D.C.: What Factors are Related to Effective Contraceptive Use

In 2011, approximately 2.8 million pregnancies in the United States were unintended, which equates to about 45% of all pregnancies, and in 2010, 62% of all pregnancies in D.C. were unintended. Since little is known about effective contraceptive use among sexually active women in D.C., this study examined sociodemographics, and sexual and reproductive health knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to effective contraceptive use among this population. Between November 2017 and April 2018, a purposive non-random stratified sample of women ages 15-29 were recruited across all eight wards in the District of Columbia (N = 1,573). This study will inform future family planning interventions and fill gaps in the evidence base surrounding utilization of effective methods of contraception among adolescents and women in the District of Columbia.