Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Impact of Expected Change in Weight-related Quality of Life on Risk Tolerance for Obesity Treatments

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Health Policy and Management

Keywords

obesity, treatment, risk, QoL

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

This study aimed to quantitatively assess the relationship between weight-related quality of life and the degree of risk that U.S. adults with obesity will tolerate in order to achieve their ideal body weight via pharmacological or surgical intervention. A nationally-representative sample of non-institutionalized U.S. adults (aged 18-64 years) with obesity completed a 35-question interview designed to assess opinions about the impact of excess weight on quality of life and the expected utility of obesity treatments. Expected change in weight-related quality of life was positively associated with the likelihood that participants would accept a small risk of death from anti-obesity medication (p < .001) or bariatric surgery (p < .001) to achieve their goal weight, controlling for age, gender, race, household income, current BMI, diagnosed prediabetes, and prior discussion of obesity-related risks/treatment options with a health professional. Participants’ expected changes in weight-related quality of life aligned well with actual changes reported by adults from interventional studies who achieved clinically-significant weight loss through pharmacological or surgical treatment. Expected change in weight-related quality of life predicts treatment-related risk preferences among adults with obesity who have not previously used pharmacological or surgical obesity management strategies. Incorporating formal assessment of weight-related quality of life into clinical consultations may improve the quality of shared decision-making processes and increase the likelihood of treatment engagement and satisfaction among adults with severe obesity.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Impact of Expected Change in Weight-related Quality of Life on Risk Tolerance for Obesity Treatments

This study aimed to quantitatively assess the relationship between weight-related quality of life and the degree of risk that U.S. adults with obesity will tolerate in order to achieve their ideal body weight via pharmacological or surgical intervention. A nationally-representative sample of non-institutionalized U.S. adults (aged 18-64 years) with obesity completed a 35-question interview designed to assess opinions about the impact of excess weight on quality of life and the expected utility of obesity treatments. Expected change in weight-related quality of life was positively associated with the likelihood that participants would accept a small risk of death from anti-obesity medication (p < .001) or bariatric surgery (p < .001) to achieve their goal weight, controlling for age, gender, race, household income, current BMI, diagnosed prediabetes, and prior discussion of obesity-related risks/treatment options with a health professional. Participants’ expected changes in weight-related quality of life aligned well with actual changes reported by adults from interventional studies who achieved clinically-significant weight loss through pharmacological or surgical treatment. Expected change in weight-related quality of life predicts treatment-related risk preferences among adults with obesity who have not previously used pharmacological or surgical obesity management strategies. Incorporating formal assessment of weight-related quality of life into clinical consultations may improve the quality of shared decision-making processes and increase the likelihood of treatment engagement and satisfaction among adults with severe obesity.