Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Investigating Associations between Low Calorie Sweetened Beverage Intake and Diet in Youth with Type 2 Diabetes

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Exercise and Nutrition Sciences

Keywords

Low- Calorie Sweetened Beverages, Type 2 Diabetes, Youth, Diet, Food-frequency Questionnaire

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Beverages containing low-calorie sweeteners (LCSB) offer a lower-calorie alternative to sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), yet whether they help to reduce total calorie and sugar intake and encourage weight management is unclear. This study examines associations between LCSB consumption and dietary intake in youth with type 2 diabetes (T2D), using data collected from participants enrolled in the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study. LCSB consumption was associated with higher calorie, carbohydrate, total fat, saturated fat, and protein intake. These findings challenge whether LCSB are an effective strategy to reduce total calorie intake and promote weight management, as intended.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Investigating Associations between Low Calorie Sweetened Beverage Intake and Diet in Youth with Type 2 Diabetes

Beverages containing low-calorie sweeteners (LCSB) offer a lower-calorie alternative to sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), yet whether they help to reduce total calorie and sugar intake and encourage weight management is unclear. This study examines associations between LCSB consumption and dietary intake in youth with type 2 diabetes (T2D), using data collected from participants enrolled in the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study. LCSB consumption was associated with higher calorie, carbohydrate, total fat, saturated fat, and protein intake. These findings challenge whether LCSB are an effective strategy to reduce total calorie intake and promote weight management, as intended.