Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Maternal Mortality Differences in Afghanistan and Tajikistan

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Prevention and Community Health

Keywords

maternal mortality, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, antenatal, prenatal

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Background: Bordering countries Afghanistan and Tajikistan have vastly different maternal mortality ratios—396 deaths per 100,000 live births verses 32 deaths per 100,000 live births, respectively. It is vital that pregnant women receive proper comprehensive antenatal care during pregnancy to ensure the health of mother and baby. Antenatal care is also incredibly important in reducing maternal deaths, most of which are preventable. There is little known research on the antenatal care practices and/or differences in Afghanistan and Tajikistan. Purpose: The purpose of this project is to examine differences in antenatal care practices, behaviors, and disparities that could explain the vast difference in maternal mortality ratios between Afghanistan and Tajikistan. The project will examine other factors or behaviors that would further uncover why the ratios are so disparate. Differences in socioeconomic and geopolitical statuses and social determinants of health will also be considered. Methods: This project will utilize SPSS software to conduct a secondary data analysis on the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data from Afghanistan (2015) and Tajikistan (2012) to look at antenatal care variables, and others, to show potential disparities. The project will also consist of a literature/research review to provide background on the topic area. Results: Analytic techniques will examine socioeconomic and sociodemographic characteristics and use of antenatal care. Other independent variables, like knowledge of contraception and perception of family planning, will also be compared to use of antenatal care. Further results are still ongoing. Discussion: Results will be used to guide international development and public health work, and program and intervention development.

Open Access

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Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Maternal Mortality Differences in Afghanistan and Tajikistan

Background: Bordering countries Afghanistan and Tajikistan have vastly different maternal mortality ratios—396 deaths per 100,000 live births verses 32 deaths per 100,000 live births, respectively. It is vital that pregnant women receive proper comprehensive antenatal care during pregnancy to ensure the health of mother and baby. Antenatal care is also incredibly important in reducing maternal deaths, most of which are preventable. There is little known research on the antenatal care practices and/or differences in Afghanistan and Tajikistan. Purpose: The purpose of this project is to examine differences in antenatal care practices, behaviors, and disparities that could explain the vast difference in maternal mortality ratios between Afghanistan and Tajikistan. The project will examine other factors or behaviors that would further uncover why the ratios are so disparate. Differences in socioeconomic and geopolitical statuses and social determinants of health will also be considered. Methods: This project will utilize SPSS software to conduct a secondary data analysis on the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data from Afghanistan (2015) and Tajikistan (2012) to look at antenatal care variables, and others, to show potential disparities. The project will also consist of a literature/research review to provide background on the topic area. Results: Analytic techniques will examine socioeconomic and sociodemographic characteristics and use of antenatal care. Other independent variables, like knowledge of contraception and perception of family planning, will also be compared to use of antenatal care. Further results are still ongoing. Discussion: Results will be used to guide international development and public health work, and program and intervention development.