Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Risk of Antibiotic Bacterial Infection as a Result of Household Dog and/or Cat Exposure: A Systemic Literature Review

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Environmental and Occupational Health

Keywords

household pets, antibiotic resistance, infection, microbes

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Humans have close relationships with their household pets that extend past just ownership—“companion animals” have become extensions of the family in many cases. Traditionally domestic pets, such as dogs and cats, also act as service or emotional support animals that provide benefits beyond just companionship for many private citizens. However, pets are also capable of harboring antibiotic resistant bacteria that can be transmitted to their human counterparts. As such, a systemic literature review was conducted to compile research surrounding antibiotic resistant bacterial infections in humans in connection with the ownership or co-habitation of pets—specifically dogs and/or cats. This research would then, hopefully, determine the adverse risks posed to individuals living amongst pets of acquiring antibiotic resistant bacteria infections. Qualifying studies underwent a critique process and were excluded or included based on myriad characteristics. Upon completion of the review, ten articles were selected and were reviewed through the Navigation Guide model to assess for risk of bias, quality of evidence, and strength of evidence. The studies selected were able to isolate antibiotic resistant bacteria from humans and a majority of studies took corresponding samples from animals that were in close contact with human counterparts. The outcomes of these studies were unable to yield conclusive risks posed to humans by their household pets. Studies were predominantly cross-sectional in nature and small in scale. Overall the studies were unable to determine risk posed to humans but do make the case for further research. The studies further supported the ease of interspecies transmission and the ability for animals to be reservoirs of antibiotic resistant bacteria in infections. As animals continue to rise in popularity and foster tight familial bonds, coupled with the prevalence and rise of antibiotic resistant bacteria infections, this area of research may prove necessary in the future to protect animal and owner alike.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Risk of Antibiotic Bacterial Infection as a Result of Household Dog and/or Cat Exposure: A Systemic Literature Review

Humans have close relationships with their household pets that extend past just ownership—“companion animals” have become extensions of the family in many cases. Traditionally domestic pets, such as dogs and cats, also act as service or emotional support animals that provide benefits beyond just companionship for many private citizens. However, pets are also capable of harboring antibiotic resistant bacteria that can be transmitted to their human counterparts. As such, a systemic literature review was conducted to compile research surrounding antibiotic resistant bacterial infections in humans in connection with the ownership or co-habitation of pets—specifically dogs and/or cats. This research would then, hopefully, determine the adverse risks posed to individuals living amongst pets of acquiring antibiotic resistant bacteria infections. Qualifying studies underwent a critique process and were excluded or included based on myriad characteristics. Upon completion of the review, ten articles were selected and were reviewed through the Navigation Guide model to assess for risk of bias, quality of evidence, and strength of evidence. The studies selected were able to isolate antibiotic resistant bacteria from humans and a majority of studies took corresponding samples from animals that were in close contact with human counterparts. The outcomes of these studies were unable to yield conclusive risks posed to humans by their household pets. Studies were predominantly cross-sectional in nature and small in scale. Overall the studies were unable to determine risk posed to humans but do make the case for further research. The studies further supported the ease of interspecies transmission and the ability for animals to be reservoirs of antibiotic resistant bacteria in infections. As animals continue to rise in popularity and foster tight familial bonds, coupled with the prevalence and rise of antibiotic resistant bacteria infections, this area of research may prove necessary in the future to protect animal and owner alike.