Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Assessing Readability of Patient Education Materials: A Modern Role in Female Reproductive Health

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Prevention and Community Health

Keywords

Health Literacy, Women, Sexual/Reproductive Health

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Health literacy is defined by the Center for Disease Control as the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.1 Low health literacy studies in the past have investigated literacy trends among the elderly and those of low socioeconomic status, but studies have been lacking when it comes to the female population in regards to sexual health and family planning.2 In this review, I will likely be implementing a meta/content analysis of the studies that have been done previously regarding this population and health topic, while also combing through current patient education materials provided to me through Capital Women's Care (a Washington D.C. OB/GYN practice) as well as what is available through the internet. In this review, I aim to use primary sources (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, etc.) to research articles regarding tools for assessing health literacy among this target population published up to 10 January 2018, and to develop inclusion criteria to screen this literature. It is important to understand the reading level of all of these patient education materials to be able to assess their importance and purpose related to females seeking out and following up on their sexual and reproductive healthcare needs. Low functional health literacy is associated with poor health outcomes, and nearly nine out of 10 adults lack the skills needed to fully manage their health care and prevent disease.3 This staggering figure is enough for one to seek out answers to such a difficult and pervasive issue. Sexual and reproductive health in females is complicated, and requires education that a lot of females in the United States have not had. With this study, I ultimately would like to find information about contraception, sexual health, nutrition, and cost of care that is available to women, examine the information for its understandability and accessibility, and would like to come to a conclusion about its necessity in the realm of healthcare and make suggestions about changes that would be beneficial to the target population.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Assessing Readability of Patient Education Materials: A Modern Role in Female Reproductive Health

Health literacy is defined by the Center for Disease Control as the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.1 Low health literacy studies in the past have investigated literacy trends among the elderly and those of low socioeconomic status, but studies have been lacking when it comes to the female population in regards to sexual health and family planning.2 In this review, I will likely be implementing a meta/content analysis of the studies that have been done previously regarding this population and health topic, while also combing through current patient education materials provided to me through Capital Women's Care (a Washington D.C. OB/GYN practice) as well as what is available through the internet. In this review, I aim to use primary sources (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, etc.) to research articles regarding tools for assessing health literacy among this target population published up to 10 January 2018, and to develop inclusion criteria to screen this literature. It is important to understand the reading level of all of these patient education materials to be able to assess their importance and purpose related to females seeking out and following up on their sexual and reproductive healthcare needs. Low functional health literacy is associated with poor health outcomes, and nearly nine out of 10 adults lack the skills needed to fully manage their health care and prevent disease.3 This staggering figure is enough for one to seek out answers to such a difficult and pervasive issue. Sexual and reproductive health in females is complicated, and requires education that a lot of females in the United States have not had. With this study, I ultimately would like to find information about contraception, sexual health, nutrition, and cost of care that is available to women, examine the information for its understandability and accessibility, and would like to come to a conclusion about its necessity in the realm of healthcare and make suggestions about changes that would be beneficial to the target population.