School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Medical Diagnoses and Associated Characteristics of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Infants Enrolled in the Giving Parents Support Study

Poster Number

338

Document Type

Poster

Status

Medical Student

Abstract Category

Women/Child Health

Keywords

premature, NICU, diagnoses

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Background: Children’s National Health System (CNHS) has a number of research studies being performed in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), including Giving Parents Support (GPS), a randomized controlled trial of parent navigation after NICU discharge. As a Level IV NICU, CNHS provides care to the sickest infants with a wide range of medical complexity.

Objective: To describe the medical diagnoses and associated characteristics of NICU infants enrolled in GPS.

Methods: Participants in the GPS study were enrolled from January 2016 to February 2017, and no infants were excluded due to diagnostic criteria. Approximately 300 infants were enrolled, and medical diagnoses were collected from the Children’s Hospitals Neonatal Database and classified by organ system; data was provided on 86% of GPS infants (n=257). Associated characteristics, such as infant sex and gestational age (GA), were obtained via chart review. Diagnoses belonging to preterm (<37 weeks GA) and term (37+ weeks GA) infants were categorized separately.

Results: Most infants were male (68%), full-term (55%), and diagnosed with at least one respiratory condition (58%); the majority of those in the latter group (83%) had respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). [KF1] [MC2] Of the 115 premature infants reviewed, 12% were diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), 9% were diagnosed with intraventricular hemorrhage, 2% were diagnosed with periventricular leukomalacia, and 13% were diagnosed with necrotizing enterocolitis. Of the 142 term infants reviewed, 5% were diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and 11% were diagnosed with seizure. Less than 1% of term infants received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

Conclusion: Medical diagnoses among GPS infants were variable, although most had a respiratory diagnosis of RDS. The most common diagnosis among preterm and term infants was BPD and seizure, respectively.

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Medical Diagnoses and Associated Characteristics of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Infants Enrolled in the Giving Parents Support Study

Background: Children’s National Health System (CNHS) has a number of research studies being performed in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), including Giving Parents Support (GPS), a randomized controlled trial of parent navigation after NICU discharge. As a Level IV NICU, CNHS provides care to the sickest infants with a wide range of medical complexity.

Objective: To describe the medical diagnoses and associated characteristics of NICU infants enrolled in GPS.

Methods: Participants in the GPS study were enrolled from January 2016 to February 2017, and no infants were excluded due to diagnostic criteria. Approximately 300 infants were enrolled, and medical diagnoses were collected from the Children’s Hospitals Neonatal Database and classified by organ system; data was provided on 86% of GPS infants (n=257). Associated characteristics, such as infant sex and gestational age (GA), were obtained via chart review. Diagnoses belonging to preterm (<37 weeks>GA) and term (37+ weeks GA) infants were categorized separately.

Results: Most infants were male (68%), full-term (55%), and diagnosed with at least one respiratory condition (58%); the majority of those in the latter group (83%) had respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). [KF1] [MC2] Of the 115 premature infants reviewed, 12% were diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), 9% were diagnosed with intraventricular hemorrhage, 2% were diagnosed with periventricular leukomalacia, and 13% were diagnosed with necrotizing enterocolitis. Of the 142 term infants reviewed, 5% were diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and 11% were diagnosed with seizure. Less than 1% of term infants received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

Conclusion: Medical diagnoses among GPS infants were variable, although most had a respiratory diagnosis of RDS. The most common diagnosis among preterm and term infants was BPD and seizure, respectively.