School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

GWSMHS Interdisciplinary Emergency Medicine/Trauma Surgery Ultrasound Curriculum Augmentation

Poster Number

220

Document Type

Poster

Status

Medical Student

Abstract Category

Education/Health Services

Keywords

medical education, ultrasound, FAST exam

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

The intention of this project was to provide more cohesive structure to the Extended Focused Abdominal Sonography in Trauma (eFAST) curriculum provided during the Trauma Surgery rotation at George Washington School of Medical Health Sciences (GWSMHS). Currently, the curriculum consists of a basic introductory module to the physics of ultrasound and the use of different ultrasound modalities as well as one to two hands-on practice sessions in the Emergency Department during which rotating students are guided through the eFAST. This project was composed of two steps. First, a literature review of eFAST curriculum provided at other medical schools in the United States. Second, improvement of an educational video to be viewed by GWSMHS students beginning the Trauma Surgery rotation, in order to provide an asynchronous learning module.

The intention of the literature review was to learn from the approaches that other schools have taken in teaching ultrasound, and to discover whether any other schools have used an asynchronous module in an interdisciplinary learning environment in their approach (as we planned to do). A number of the articles reviewed looked at the feasibility of adding ultrasound to their curriculum, and shared the details (learning objectives, structure, timelines) of their proposed curriculum. Overall, schools found that the addition of ultrasound to curriculum was well received by students, and improved educational outcomes. While inclusion of ultrasound into undergraduate medical education is a hot topic in medical education, and a number of schools are developing innovation new curriculums to apply it, there was no other school developing an asynchronous module to introduce ultrasound to medical students, which makes the project at GW unique.

I will continue to work with my fellow medical student and with Dr. Ogle to improve the asynchronous learning module, as well as to develop an assessment for 3rd year medical students entering the trauma surgery rotation.

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Creative Commons License
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GWSMHS Interdisciplinary Emergency Medicine/Trauma Surgery Ultrasound Curriculum Augmentation

The intention of this project was to provide more cohesive structure to the Extended Focused Abdominal Sonography in Trauma (eFAST) curriculum provided during the Trauma Surgery rotation at George Washington School of Medical Health Sciences (GWSMHS). Currently, the curriculum consists of a basic introductory module to the physics of ultrasound and the use of different ultrasound modalities as well as one to two hands-on practice sessions in the Emergency Department during which rotating students are guided through the eFAST. This project was composed of two steps. First, a literature review of eFAST curriculum provided at other medical schools in the United States. Second, improvement of an educational video to be viewed by GWSMHS students beginning the Trauma Surgery rotation, in order to provide an asynchronous learning module.

The intention of the literature review was to learn from the approaches that other schools have taken in teaching ultrasound, and to discover whether any other schools have used an asynchronous module in an interdisciplinary learning environment in their approach (as we planned to do). A number of the articles reviewed looked at the feasibility of adding ultrasound to their curriculum, and shared the details (learning objectives, structure, timelines) of their proposed curriculum. Overall, schools found that the addition of ultrasound to curriculum was well received by students, and improved educational outcomes. While inclusion of ultrasound into undergraduate medical education is a hot topic in medical education, and a number of schools are developing innovation new curriculums to apply it, there was no other school developing an asynchronous module to introduce ultrasound to medical students, which makes the project at GW unique.

I will continue to work with my fellow medical student and with Dr. Ogle to improve the asynchronous learning module, as well as to develop an assessment for 3rd year medical students entering the trauma surgery rotation.