School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Progression of Authorship of Manuscripts in The American Journal of Cardiology 1958-2016

Poster Number

138

Document Type

Poster

Status

Medical Student

Abstract Category

Cardiology/Cardiovascular Research

Keywords

authorship, progression

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Purpose: Manuscript publication is essential in advancing ones career in academia. Consequently, the characteristics of authorship progression in academia has gained interest due to its value. Under this lens publications have become an elemental aspect of an applicants’ application in all stages; medical school, residency, fellowship and faculty positions. Various studies looking at authorship developments have been established in other medical subspecialty such as Dermatology, Ophthalmology and Hand Surgery however a similar analysis in Cardiology is imperative. As a result, we explored the progression of authorship in The American Journal of Cardiology, a fundamental journal in the history of Cardiology. Methods: In this study, manuscripts published in 1958, 1966, 1976, 1986, 1996, 2006 and 2016 were analyzed. Parameters used were gender of published first and last authors, number of authors per article, the authors’ qualifications and country of corresponding authors’. A total of 4329 were analyzed. Overtime we hypothesize an increase in authors per article, variety of authors’ degrees, medley of countries contributing to authorship and an increase in female authorship. Results: The mean number of articles per author increased from 1.77 in 1958 to 8.58 in 2016. Similarly, average number of references per article increased from 8.3 in 1958 to 23.4 in 2016. The variety of qualifications of first authorship and last authorship also increased. Particularly, first authors and last authors holding degrees in MD/PhD and Masters. Female first and last authorship showed significant increase over the years. In 1958 female first authors comprised of 3% of all the publications compared to 22% in 2016. Analogously, female last authors accounted for 2% of all publications in 1958 compared to 19% in 2016. There was also a significant contribution in articles originating from “Asia” and “Europe”. Conclusion: There has been a significant increase in authors per article, references per article, variety of degrees and contribution from international authors in the American Journal of Cardiology. Female authors have increased significantly over the 58 year time period. In our poster presentation the trends observed highlighted similar shifts seen in other medical and academic fields. These characteristics in part can be explained by the increase pressure to publish to further ones career and increase of women into various fields of academia.

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Progression of Authorship of Manuscripts in The American Journal of Cardiology 1958-2016

Purpose: Manuscript publication is essential in advancing ones career in academia. Consequently, the characteristics of authorship progression in academia has gained interest due to its value. Under this lens publications have become an elemental aspect of an applicants’ application in all stages; medical school, residency, fellowship and faculty positions. Various studies looking at authorship developments have been established in other medical subspecialty such as Dermatology, Ophthalmology and Hand Surgery however a similar analysis in Cardiology is imperative. As a result, we explored the progression of authorship in The American Journal of Cardiology, a fundamental journal in the history of Cardiology. Methods: In this study, manuscripts published in 1958, 1966, 1976, 1986, 1996, 2006 and 2016 were analyzed. Parameters used were gender of published first and last authors, number of authors per article, the authors’ qualifications and country of corresponding authors’. A total of 4329 were analyzed. Overtime we hypothesize an increase in authors per article, variety of authors’ degrees, medley of countries contributing to authorship and an increase in female authorship. Results: The mean number of articles per author increased from 1.77 in 1958 to 8.58 in 2016. Similarly, average number of references per article increased from 8.3 in 1958 to 23.4 in 2016. The variety of qualifications of first authorship and last authorship also increased. Particularly, first authors and last authors holding degrees in MD/PhD and Masters. Female first and last authorship showed significant increase over the years. In 1958 female first authors comprised of 3% of all the publications compared to 22% in 2016. Analogously, female last authors accounted for 2% of all publications in 1958 compared to 19% in 2016. There was also a significant contribution in articles originating from “Asia” and “Europe”. Conclusion: There has been a significant increase in authors per article, references per article, variety of degrees and contribution from international authors in the American Journal of Cardiology. Female authors have increased significantly over the 58 year time period. In our poster presentation the trends observed highlighted similar shifts seen in other medical and academic fields. These characteristics in part can be explained by the increase pressure to publish to further ones career and increase of women into various fields of academia.