Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

A Qualitative Analysis of Structural Barriers in HIV Prevention Services

Poster Number

57

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Masters

Abstract Category

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Keywords

HIV, Black MSM, Prevention, Qualitative

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Background: Black men who have sex with men (MSM) are not only disproportionately burdened by HIV rates, but also by structural level barriers that impede their access and engagement with prevention services. An exploration of how different social influences affect Black MSM and what solutions are available to overcome these dynamics in prevention services are not conclusively understood.

Methods: A descriptive qualitative analysis of Black MSM aged 18 and older was conducted to identify structural factors experienced while accessing prevention and general healthcare services in the District of Columbia. Thirty semi-structured interviews were transcribed, reframed into a thematic codebook, and evaluated to characterize how different social influences acted as barriers and facilitators in the HIV prevention continuum.

Results: Participant interviews identified multiple structural barriers and revealed unique themes along provider, individual, and infrastructural levels of influences. The interviews also identified facilitators to prevention services and explored potential opportunities to overcome barriers to HIV testing, retention services, and adherence support.

Conclusions: Black MSM report facing a variety of complex barriers in general healthcare and along the HIV prevention continuum. The provision of HIV services must account for the impact of structural barriers and take advantage of opportunities to overcome their influence on key populations. This study recommends that culturally suitable and population guided policies are among ways to improve the uptake of HIV services by Black MSM.

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Creative Commons License
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A Qualitative Analysis of Structural Barriers in HIV Prevention Services

Background: Black men who have sex with men (MSM) are not only disproportionately burdened by HIV rates, but also by structural level barriers that impede their access and engagement with prevention services. An exploration of how different social influences affect Black MSM and what solutions are available to overcome these dynamics in prevention services are not conclusively understood.

Methods: A descriptive qualitative analysis of Black MSM aged 18 and older was conducted to identify structural factors experienced while accessing prevention and general healthcare services in the District of Columbia. Thirty semi-structured interviews were transcribed, reframed into a thematic codebook, and evaluated to characterize how different social influences acted as barriers and facilitators in the HIV prevention continuum.

Results: Participant interviews identified multiple structural barriers and revealed unique themes along provider, individual, and infrastructural levels of influences. The interviews also identified facilitators to prevention services and explored potential opportunities to overcome barriers to HIV testing, retention services, and adherence support.

Conclusions: Black MSM report facing a variety of complex barriers in general healthcare and along the HIV prevention continuum. The provision of HIV services must account for the impact of structural barriers and take advantage of opportunities to overcome their influence on key populations. This study recommends that culturally suitable and population guided policies are among ways to improve the uptake of HIV services by Black MSM.