Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Cardiovascular health is associated with disability among older community dwelling men and women

Poster Number

78

Document Type

Poster

Status

Staff

Abstract Category

Exercise and Nutrition Sciences

Keywords

InCHIANTI study of aging, ADL, IADL, worsening disability

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Background: Disability is a public health concern affecting the quality of life among the elderly. Our study investigated whether an index of overall cardiovascular health (CVH) based on American Heart Association guidelines is associated with disability in older individuals.

Methods: Data from the InCHIANTI study were used to assess the associations between CVH and disability among 925 cohort participants (³65 years, 55% women) with median follow-up 9-years. CVH score, ranging from 0-12 (maximum possible score of 14), was operationalized using adherence to ideal levels for health behaviors including smoking status, physical activity, body mass index, and diet quality; and health factors including blood pressure, plasma cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, with higher scores indicating better CVH. Disability was examined using Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and Activities of Daily Living (ADL) questionnaires. If a participant indicated that they were unable to accomplish a task, they were considered to have a disability. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models assessed the relationship between baseline CVH with ADL and IADL disability and worsening over 9-years. Cox proportional hazard models examined associations between baseline CVH and disability in participants without disability at baseline.

Results: For GEE models, a 1-point increase in the CVH score was associated with 23% and 17% of lower odds of ADL (odds ratio [OR]=0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI): [0.69-0.86], p<0.001) and IADL (OR=0.83, 95% CI: [0.77-0.89], p<0.001) disability. Higher CVH scores were also protective of worsening of disability over 9-years. Additionally, Cox models demonstrated that a 1-point increase in CVH score was associated with lower hazards of both ADL (hazard ratio [HR]=0.86, 95% CI: [0.77-0.95], p=0.005) and IADL (HR=0.91, 95% CI: [0.86-0.98], p=0.007) disability.

Conclusions: In this cohort of older individuals, better CVH was associated with lower risk of ADL and IADL disability and worsening over 9-years.

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Cardiovascular health is associated with disability among older community dwelling men and women

Background: Disability is a public health concern affecting the quality of life among the elderly. Our study investigated whether an index of overall cardiovascular health (CVH) based on American Heart Association guidelines is associated with disability in older individuals.

Methods: Data from the InCHIANTI study were used to assess the associations between CVH and disability among 925 cohort participants (³65 years, 55% women) with median follow-up 9-years. CVH score, ranging from 0-12 (maximum possible score of 14), was operationalized using adherence to ideal levels for health behaviors including smoking status, physical activity, body mass index, and diet quality; and health factors including blood pressure, plasma cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, with higher scores indicating better CVH. Disability was examined using Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and Activities of Daily Living (ADL) questionnaires. If a participant indicated that they were unable to accomplish a task, they were considered to have a disability. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models assessed the relationship between baseline CVH with ADL and IADL disability and worsening over 9-years. Cox proportional hazard models examined associations between baseline CVH and disability in participants without disability at baseline.

Results: For GEE models, a 1-point increase in the CVH score was associated with 23% and 17% of lower odds of ADL (odds ratio [OR]=0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI): [0.69-0.86], p<0.001) and IADL (OR=0.83, 95% CI: [0.77-0.89], p<0.001) disability. Higher CVH scores were also protective of worsening of disability over 9-years. Additionally, Cox models demonstrated that a 1-point increase in CVH score was associated with lower hazards of both ADL (hazard ratio [HR]=0.86, 95% CI: [0.77-0.95], p=0.005) and IADL (HR=0.91, 95% CI: [0.86-0.98], p=0.007) disability.

Conclusions: In this cohort of older individuals, better CVH was associated with lower risk of ADL and IADL disability and worsening over 9-years.