Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

9-2017

Journal

Preventive Medicine Reports

Volume

7

Inclusive Pages

158–161

DOI

10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.06.002

Abstract

African Americans have higher rates of mortality than whites who are the same age and sex. We hypothesize that in low socioeconomic status neighborhoods, having health insurance coverage and a regular health care provider increases the likelihood of receiving diagnostic tests for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We use data from a random two-stage cluster sample of 230 adults living in high poverty census tracts to examine the effects of insurance coverage and having a regular doctor on the likelihood receiving diagnostic tests for high cholesterol, high blood sugar, and blood pressure. We find that health insurance coverage increases the odds of having a regular health care provider (p < 0.05) and of receiving the diagnostic tests (p < 0.05). Having a regular doctor mediates the effect of insurance coverage on the likelihood of receiving the tests, especially when the participant can report the physician's name.

Comments

Reproduced with permission of Elsevier B.V. Preventive Medicine Reports

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Peer Reviewed

1

Open Access

1

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