Title

The Relationship between Social Network Body Size and the Body Size Norms of Black and Hispanic Adults

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

10-30-2015

Journal

Preventive Medicine Reports

Volume

2

Inclusive Pages

941-5

DOI

10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.10.014

Abstract

Objective

To examine the relationship between the body size norms of Black and Hispanic adults and the body sizes of their social network members.

Methods

Egocentric network data were examined for 245 adults recruited from 2012–2013 in New York City. A multivariable regression model was used to examine the relationship between participants' perception of normal body size and the body sizes of their network members adjusted for participant age, education, race/ethnicity and network size. Participants' body size norms were also examined stratified by the following characteristics of obese network members: frequency of contact, living proximity, relationship, and importance of relationship.

Results

Index participants were 89% female with mean body mass index 33.5 kg/m2. There were 2571 network members identified (31% overweight, 10% obese). In the fully adjusted multivariable model, perception of normal body size increased as the number of network members with obesity increased (p < 0.01). Larger body size norms were associated with increased frequency of contact with obese network members (p = 0.04), and obese members living in the home (p = 0.049).

Conclusions

These findings support a relationship between the body size norms of Black and Hispanic adults and their social network body size.

Comments

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relationship between the body size norms of Black and Hispanic adults and the body sizes of their social network members.

METHODS:

Egocentric network data were examined for 245 adults recruited from 2012-2013 in New York City. A multivariable regression model was used to examine the relationship between participants' perception of normal body size and the body sizes of their network members adjusted for participant age, education, race/ethnicity and network size. Participants' body size norms were also examined stratified by the following characteristics of obese network members: frequency of contact, living proximity, relationship, and importance of relationship.

RESULTS:

Index participants were 89% female with mean body mass index 33.5 kg/m2. There were 2,571 network members identified (31% overweight, 10% obese). In the fully adjusted multivariable model, perception of normal body size increased as the number of network members with obesity increased (p<0.01). Larger body size norms were associated with increased frequency of contact with obese network members (p=0.04), and obese members living in the home (p=0.049).

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings support a relationship between the body size norms of Black and Hispanic adults and their social network body size.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Peer Reviewed

1

Open Access

1