School of Nursing Poster Presentations

Title

A Retrospective Analysis of Surgeon Estimated Time and Actual Operative Time to Develop an Efficient Operating Room Scheduling System

Document Type

Poster

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Problem: Surgical departments account for sizable budgets in hospitals. To ensure efficiency, optimal processes need to be maintained. The current practice for posting a surgical case is using surgeon estimated times (SETs), which only includes the reporting points of component 2 (C2) incision to dressing.


Objective: To analyze if there was a significant difference in minutes between actual operative times (AOT) and SET in patients undergoing outpatient general laparoscopic and inpatient orthopedic total joint surgery.

Methods: The facility is a level one trauma teaching center, with 371 beds, and a yearly surgical volume of 17,000 cases. This retrospective study used random sampling to compare and analyze the difference between AOT and SET, as well as actual operating room time (AORT): component one (C1) - patient in OR to before incision and component 3 (C3) - after dressing to patient out of OR. With a statistical power level of 0.8%, an alpha of 0.05%, a sample size of 120 surgical patients from each category was included.

Results: In hypotheses testing for outpatient general laparoscopic and inpatient orthopedic total joint patients, the results indicated that SET time (mean=105.8, + 31.6; mean=147, +36.4) in minutes was significantly greater than the AOT times (mean=75.5, + 30.6; p=0.001; mean=111.5, +23.4; p=0.0001) in minutes, respectively.

Conclusions: The results uncovered a significant variance between AOT and SET suggested over booking; whereas in AORT and SET, results suggested under booking. An interdisciplinary team will be assembled to develop an efficient scheduling system.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

To be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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A Retrospective Analysis of Surgeon Estimated Time and Actual Operative Time to Develop an Efficient Operating Room Scheduling System

Problem: Surgical departments account for sizable budgets in hospitals. To ensure efficiency, optimal processes need to be maintained. The current practice for posting a surgical case is using surgeon estimated times (SETs), which only includes the reporting points of component 2 (C2) incision to dressing.


Objective: To analyze if there was a significant difference in minutes between actual operative times (AOT) and SET in patients undergoing outpatient general laparoscopic and inpatient orthopedic total joint surgery.

Methods: The facility is a level one trauma teaching center, with 371 beds, and a yearly surgical volume of 17,000 cases. This retrospective study used random sampling to compare and analyze the difference between AOT and SET, as well as actual operating room time (AORT): component one (C1) - patient in OR to before incision and component 3 (C3) - after dressing to patient out of OR. With a statistical power level of 0.8%, an alpha of 0.05%, a sample size of 120 surgical patients from each category was included.

Results: In hypotheses testing for outpatient general laparoscopic and inpatient orthopedic total joint patients, the results indicated that SET time (mean=105.8, + 31.6; mean=147, +36.4) in minutes was significantly greater than the AOT times (mean=75.5, + 30.6; p=0.001; mean=111.5, +23.4; p=0.0001) in minutes, respectively.

Conclusions: The results uncovered a significant variance between AOT and SET suggested over booking; whereas in AORT and SET, results suggested under booking. An interdisciplinary team will be assembled to develop an efficient scheduling system.