School of Nursing Poster Presentations

Title

Variables Associated with Overweight/Obesity among African American Women with Hypertension and Diabetes

Document Type

Poster

Keywords

African American; women; overweight/obesity; BRFSS

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Obesity is the second leading cause of preventable death next to tobacco use. It is a contributing factor to chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Although it is prevalent in all populations regardless of age, sex, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, education level, or geographic region, it disproportionately affects African Americans (AA), in particularly AA women. Overweight/obesity increases AA women’s chances of developing chronic illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and stroke, and decreases their life expectancy. It is imperative to identify modifiable risk factors that relate to overweight/obesity among this population so health care providers can develop interventions to decrease the rate of overweight/obesity. The purpose of this study was to explore variables associates with overweight/obesity among AA women with hypertension and diabetes.

METHODS

This was a secondary data analysis using descriptive-correlational design to analyze cross sectional data obtained from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), the nation’s premier system of health-related ongoing telephone health survey of adults ages 18 years and older. AA women (n =1823) with high blood pressure and/or diabetes were included in the analysis. The dependent variable was overweight/obesity. Independent variables included demographics (age, education, marital status, and household income), physical activity, consumption of fruits/vegetables, life satisfaction, perceived emotional support, and inadequate sleep. Descriptive statistics were performed on all study variables. Chi-Square analysis was used to study the relationship between each independent variable and the dependent variable. For all analyses, alpha was set at 0.05.

RESULTS

The majority of the sample of 1,823 AA women were 44 years of age or younger (97.2%). This group also had a significantly higher percentage of those in the overweight/obese category χ2(1) = 13.32, p < .001 versus those 45 years and older. There were no statistically significant results for any of the independent variables.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite the lack of statistically significant results for this study, it is important to note the significant missing data on the emotional support and life satisfaction scores. The lack of responses could steer the need for further studies where obtaining this information is made possible within a more sensitive and trusting manner. Thus, further identifying lasting interventions that decrease the rate of overweight/obese AA women, as the interventions would require a multifaceted approach.

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Creative Commons License
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Comments

To be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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Variables Associated with Overweight/Obesity among African American Women with Hypertension and Diabetes

BACKGROUND

Obesity is the second leading cause of preventable death next to tobacco use. It is a contributing factor to chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Although it is prevalent in all populations regardless of age, sex, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, education level, or geographic region, it disproportionately affects African Americans (AA), in particularly AA women. Overweight/obesity increases AA women’s chances of developing chronic illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and stroke, and decreases their life expectancy. It is imperative to identify modifiable risk factors that relate to overweight/obesity among this population so health care providers can develop interventions to decrease the rate of overweight/obesity. The purpose of this study was to explore variables associates with overweight/obesity among AA women with hypertension and diabetes.

METHODS

This was a secondary data analysis using descriptive-correlational design to analyze cross sectional data obtained from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), the nation’s premier system of health-related ongoing telephone health survey of adults ages 18 years and older. AA women (n =1823) with high blood pressure and/or diabetes were included in the analysis. The dependent variable was overweight/obesity. Independent variables included demographics (age, education, marital status, and household income), physical activity, consumption of fruits/vegetables, life satisfaction, perceived emotional support, and inadequate sleep. Descriptive statistics were performed on all study variables. Chi-Square analysis was used to study the relationship between each independent variable and the dependent variable. For all analyses, alpha was set at 0.05.

RESULTS

The majority of the sample of 1,823 AA women were 44 years of age or younger (97.2%). This group also had a significantly higher percentage of those in the overweight/obese category χ2(1) = 13.32, p < .001 versus those 45 years and older. There were no statistically significant results for any of the independent variables.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite the lack of statistically significant results for this study, it is important to note the significant missing data on the emotional support and life satisfaction scores. The lack of responses could steer the need for further studies where obtaining this information is made possible within a more sensitive and trusting manner. Thus, further identifying lasting interventions that decrease the rate of overweight/obese AA women, as the interventions would require a multifaceted approach.