School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Outcome ketamine infusions: is there a difference between 1 and 3-day infusions?

Document Type

Poster

Keywords

Chronic pain; neuropathic pain; ketamine; outpatient ketamine infusion

Publication Date

Spring 2017

Abstract

Introduction:

Chronic pain impacts many aspects of a patient’s quality of life (QOL). Ketamine is a NMDA receptor antagonist that has been used for neuropathic pain. This study aims to: (1) evaluate the impact of outpatient ketamine infusions on pain and QOL with a larger sample size than our previous study; (2) determine if there is a difference in results in patients receiving 1 or 3-day infusions; and, (3) examine whether repeated infusions have an influence on outcomes.

Methods:

With IRB approval, 118 patients completed the basic pain inventory (BPI) to rate, on a scale from 0 to 10, their pain and the degree pain interfered with QOL (general activity, walking, work, relationships, mood, sleep, and enjoyment of life). The BPI was completed prior to 1 or 3-day infusions and was repeated 2-4 weeks after infusions. Paired two tailed t-tests and random effect mixed models were used to compare post and pre-infusion scores.

Results:

There was statistically significant improvement (p<0.05) in pain, enjoyment of life, general activity, mood, work, relationships, and sleep, but not walking (p= 0.2419). There was no significant difference in outcomes between 1 and 3-day infusions. However, this may be overstated, as there was a small sample of 1-day infusions. Repeaters had significant cumulative improvement in enjoyment of life (p= 0.0132) and relationships (p= 0.0092) with increased number of repeated infusions.

Conclusion:

1 and 3-day outpatient ketamine infusions improve pain levels and QOL and may provide cumulative benefits with repeated infusions in patients with chronic neuropathic pain.

References

Collins, S., et al. NMDA receptor antagonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Pain Med, 2010. 11(11): p. 1726-42.

Niesters, M., C. Martini, and A. Dahan. Ketamine for chronic pain: risks and benefits. Br J Clin Pharmacol, 2014. 77 (2): p. 357-67.

Introduction:

Chronic pain impacts many aspects of a patient’s quality of life (QOL). Ketamine is a NMDA receptor antagonist that has been used for neuropathic pain. This study aims to: (1) evaluate the impact of outpatient ketamine infusions on pain and QOL with a larger sample size than our previous study; (2) determine if there is a difference in results in patients receiving 1 or 3-day infusions; and, (3) examine whether repeated infusions have an influence on outcomes.

Methods:

With IRB approval, 118 patients completed the basic pain inventory (BPI) to rate, on a scale from 0 to 10, their pain and the degree pain interfered with QOL (general activity, walking, work, relationships, mood, sleep, and enjoyment of life). The BPI was completed prior to 1 or 3-day infusions and was repeated 2-4 weeks after infusions. Paired two tailed t-tests and random effect mixed models were used to compare post and pre-infusion scores.

Results:

There was statistically significant improvement (p<0.05) in pain, enjoyment of life, general activity, mood, work, relationships, and sleep, but not walking (p= 0.2419). There was no significant difference in outcomes between 1 and 3-day infusions. However, this may be overstated, as there was a small sample of 1-day infusions. Repeaters had significant cumulative improvement in enjoyment of life (p= 0.0132) and relationships (p= 0.0092) with increased number of repeated infusions.

Conclusion:

1 and 3-day outpatient ketamine infusions improve pain levels and QOL and may provide cumulative benefits with repeated infusions in patients with chronic neuropathic pain.

References

Collins, S., et al. NMDA receptor antagonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Pain Med, 2010. 11(11): p. 1726-42.

Niesters, M., C. Martini, and A. Dahan. Ketamine for chronic pain: risks and benefits. Br J Clin Pharmacol, 2014. 77 (2): p. 357-67.

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Poster to be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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Outcome ketamine infusions: is there a difference between 1 and 3-day infusions?

Introduction:

Chronic pain impacts many aspects of a patient’s quality of life (QOL). Ketamine is a NMDA receptor antagonist that has been used for neuropathic pain. This study aims to: (1) evaluate the impact of outpatient ketamine infusions on pain and QOL with a larger sample size than our previous study; (2) determine if there is a difference in results in patients receiving 1 or 3-day infusions; and, (3) examine whether repeated infusions have an influence on outcomes.

Methods:

With IRB approval, 118 patients completed the basic pain inventory (BPI) to rate, on a scale from 0 to 10, their pain and the degree pain interfered with QOL (general activity, walking, work, relationships, mood, sleep, and enjoyment of life). The BPI was completed prior to 1 or 3-day infusions and was repeated 2-4 weeks after infusions. Paired two tailed t-tests and random effect mixed models were used to compare post and pre-infusion scores.

Results:

There was statistically significant improvement (p<0.05) in pain, enjoyment of life, general activity, mood, work, relationships, and sleep, but not walking (p= 0.2419). There was no significant difference in outcomes between 1 and 3-day infusions. However, this may be overstated, as there was a small sample of 1-day infusions. Repeaters had significant cumulative improvement in enjoyment of life (p= 0.0132) and relationships (p= 0.0092) with increased number of repeated infusions.

Conclusion:

1 and 3-day outpatient ketamine infusions improve pain levels and QOL and may provide cumulative benefits with repeated infusions in patients with chronic neuropathic pain.

References

Collins, S., et al. NMDA receptor antagonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Pain Med, 2010. 11(11): p. 1726-42.

Niesters, M., C. Martini, and A. Dahan. Ketamine for chronic pain: risks and benefits. Br J Clin Pharmacol, 2014. 77 (2): p. 357-67.

Introduction:

Chronic pain impacts many aspects of a patient’s quality of life (QOL). Ketamine is a NMDA receptor antagonist that has been used for neuropathic pain. This study aims to: (1) evaluate the impact of outpatient ketamine infusions on pain and QOL with a larger sample size than our previous study; (2) determine if there is a difference in results in patients receiving 1 or 3-day infusions; and, (3) examine whether repeated infusions have an influence on outcomes.

Methods:

With IRB approval, 118 patients completed the basic pain inventory (BPI) to rate, on a scale from 0 to 10, their pain and the degree pain interfered with QOL (general activity, walking, work, relationships, mood, sleep, and enjoyment of life). The BPI was completed prior to 1 or 3-day infusions and was repeated 2-4 weeks after infusions. Paired two tailed t-tests and random effect mixed models were used to compare post and pre-infusion scores.

Results:

There was statistically significant improvement (p<0.05) in pain, enjoyment of life, general activity, mood, work, relationships, and sleep, but not walking (p= 0.2419). There was no significant difference in outcomes between 1 and 3-day infusions. However, this may be overstated, as there was a small sample of 1-day infusions. Repeaters had significant cumulative improvement in enjoyment of life (p= 0.0132) and relationships (p= 0.0092) with increased number of repeated infusions.

Conclusion:

1 and 3-day outpatient ketamine infusions improve pain levels and QOL and may provide cumulative benefits with repeated infusions in patients with chronic neuropathic pain.

References

Collins, S., et al. NMDA receptor antagonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Pain Med, 2010. 11(11): p. 1726-42.

Niesters, M., C. Martini, and A. Dahan. Ketamine for chronic pain: risks and benefits. Br J Clin Pharmacol, 2014. 77 (2): p. 357-67.