School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Improving Patient Experience in Hospitalized Patients Through a Music Listening Program

Document Type

Poster

Keywords

Music; Psychiatry; Anxiety; Pain

Publication Date

Spring 2017

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Identifying and treating frequent psychiatric problems facing patients entering critical care units, including delirium, depression, and anxiety are important to decrease patient suffering and improve morbidity and mortality. Music programs have been studied in various populations as a means to alleviate symptoms of depression or anxiety. Music therapy provides an alternative modality to get in touch with emotions, but there are limited studies that examine impact of receptive music listening on mood and patient satisfaction (Erkkla, 2011).

OBJECTIVE: The primary goal of the study is to determine the effect of music listening on hospitalized patients’ anxiety, pain perception, as-needed medication usage, and patient satisfaction compared to standard care provided by a psychiatric consult service.

METHODS: Participants include patients who are identified by the primary team to require a psychiatric consult. Participants must be 18 years or older and must have capacity to participate in surveys. Participants were randomly assigned to either the music program group (intervention) vs. standard care after consent. Pre-test surveys and post-test surveys are completed in both groups at enrollment and 24 hours after enrollment. This study was approved by Institutional Review Board of George Washington University Hospital.

RESULTS: At baseline, there is no statistical difference between the control vs. intervention group due to randomization in terms of age, sex, employment, education, marital status, whether they own their own music (p>0.10), pain score (p>0.10), frequency of as-needed medication, or type of as-needed medication used in last 24 hours (p>0.10). At baseline, intervention group had higher anxiety score and a sub-scale score after randomization (p<0.10). Of 84 people approached, 39.3% (n=33) agreed to enroll in either the music intervention group (n=16) or control (n=17). The music intervention group shows decrease in Trait Anxiety sub-scale but not total anxiety score at baseline and follow-up (p<=0.10). In terms of patient satisfaction, 62.5% of patients (n=10) rated the music as "good" or "excellent" and provided positive comments about the program. In terms of nurse satisfaction, 43.8% of nurses (n=7) rated the music program as "good" or "excellent" and 50.1% (n=8) "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that as-needed medication usage decreased in intervention group, and provided positive comments about the program.

CONCLUSION: Preliminary results suggest that music listening program may decrease a sub-scale on self-anxiety rating. Qualitative feedback from patients and nurses suggest that music listening may also improve patient experience during hospitalization and reduce as-needed medication usage. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness and feasibility of implementing music listening program in hospitalized patients.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

Poster to be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Improving Patient Experience in Hospitalized Patients Through a Music Listening Program

INTRODUCTION: Identifying and treating frequent psychiatric problems facing patients entering critical care units, including delirium, depression, and anxiety are important to decrease patient suffering and improve morbidity and mortality. Music programs have been studied in various populations as a means to alleviate symptoms of depression or anxiety. Music therapy provides an alternative modality to get in touch with emotions, but there are limited studies that examine impact of receptive music listening on mood and patient satisfaction (Erkkla, 2011).

OBJECTIVE: The primary goal of the study is to determine the effect of music listening on hospitalized patients’ anxiety, pain perception, as-needed medication usage, and patient satisfaction compared to standard care provided by a psychiatric consult service.

METHODS: Participants include patients who are identified by the primary team to require a psychiatric consult. Participants must be 18 years or older and must have capacity to participate in surveys. Participants were randomly assigned to either the music program group (intervention) vs. standard care after consent. Pre-test surveys and post-test surveys are completed in both groups at enrollment and 24 hours after enrollment. This study was approved by Institutional Review Board of George Washington University Hospital.

RESULTS: At baseline, there is no statistical difference between the control vs. intervention group due to randomization in terms of age, sex, employment, education, marital status, whether they own their own music (p>0.10), pain score (p>0.10), frequency of as-needed medication, or type of as-needed medication used in last 24 hours (p>0.10). At baseline, intervention group had higher anxiety score and a sub-scale score after randomization (p<0.10). Of 84 people approached, 39.3% (n=33) agreed to enroll in either the music intervention group (n=16) or control (n=17). The music intervention group shows decrease in Trait Anxiety sub-scale but not total anxiety score at baseline and follow-up (p<=0.10). In terms of patient satisfaction, 62.5% of patients (n=10) rated the music as "good" or "excellent" and provided positive comments about the program. In terms of nurse satisfaction, 43.8% of nurses (n=7) rated the music program as "good" or "excellent" and 50.1% (n=8) "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that as-needed medication usage decreased in intervention group, and provided positive comments about the program.

CONCLUSION: Preliminary results suggest that music listening program may decrease a sub-scale on self-anxiety rating. Qualitative feedback from patients and nurses suggest that music listening may also improve patient experience during hospitalization and reduce as-needed medication usage. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness and feasibility of implementing music listening program in hospitalized patients.