Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

The Effect of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles via Intranasal Instillation on Oxidative Stress in Mice Brain: A Systematic Review

Poster Number

36

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Masters

Abstract Category

Environmental and Occupational Health

Keywords

review, TiO2, oxidative stress, brain

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Background: With a wide range of applications, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have become one of the top five most commonly used nanomaterial worldwide. TiO2 NPs occur in three crystalline polymorphs. Anatase TiO2 NPs has a higher surface area and gives rise to a more superior photocatalytic performance, leading to its high use. However, this property results in the formation of highly reactive radicals, producing more adverse biological effects than its other counterparts. A growing number of studies have documented that TiO2 NPs can cross the blood brain barrier, leading to accumulation in the brain, yet little research has been done examining the impact on oxidative stress in the brain after TiO2 NPs exposure.

Objective: This systematic review sought to identify relevant studies evaluating the relationship between exposure to anatase TiO2 via intranasal instillation and oxidative stress in mice brain, summarize the exposure data for each neurotoxic endpoint, and identify a dose-effect relationship.

Methods: Compendex, Inspec, Inspec Archive, GEOBASE, Knovel, PubMed, Cochrane, Scopus, and the reference lists of included studies were searched for all related studies in English.

Results: Four studies were identified that investigated the effect of oxidative stress in mice brain after exposure to anatase TiO2 NPs. The biomarkers used to measure oxidative stress in the brain include O2-, H2O2, MDA, carbonyl content, 8-OHdG, GSH-Px and GSH activities, GST, CAT activities, and SOD. MDA was the only biomarker consistently used in all four studies. Increased exposure to TiO2 NPs was significantly associated with an increase in oxidative stress.

Conclusion: Each of the four studies used different biomarkers to measure oxidative stress, making comparison between the studies' findings challenging. However, based on our findings, we concluded that there is sufficient evidence that mice exposure to anatase TiO2 NPs via intranasal instillation leads to oxidative stress in the brain.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

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To be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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The Effect of Anatase Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles via Intranasal Instillation on Oxidative Stress in Mice Brain: A Systematic Review

Background: With a wide range of applications, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have become one of the top five most commonly used nanomaterial worldwide. TiO2 NPs occur in three crystalline polymorphs. Anatase TiO2 NPs has a higher surface area and gives rise to a more superior photocatalytic performance, leading to its high use. However, this property results in the formation of highly reactive radicals, producing more adverse biological effects than its other counterparts. A growing number of studies have documented that TiO2 NPs can cross the blood brain barrier, leading to accumulation in the brain, yet little research has been done examining the impact on oxidative stress in the brain after TiO2 NPs exposure.

Objective: This systematic review sought to identify relevant studies evaluating the relationship between exposure to anatase TiO2 via intranasal instillation and oxidative stress in mice brain, summarize the exposure data for each neurotoxic endpoint, and identify a dose-effect relationship.

Methods: Compendex, Inspec, Inspec Archive, GEOBASE, Knovel, PubMed, Cochrane, Scopus, and the reference lists of included studies were searched for all related studies in English.

Results: Four studies were identified that investigated the effect of oxidative stress in mice brain after exposure to anatase TiO2 NPs. The biomarkers used to measure oxidative stress in the brain include O2-, H2O2, MDA, carbonyl content, 8-OHdG, GSH-Px and GSH activities, GST, CAT activities, and SOD. MDA was the only biomarker consistently used in all four studies. Increased exposure to TiO2 NPs was significantly associated with an increase in oxidative stress.

Conclusion: Each of the four studies used different biomarkers to measure oxidative stress, making comparison between the studies' findings challenging. However, based on our findings, we concluded that there is sufficient evidence that mice exposure to anatase TiO2 NPs via intranasal instillation leads to oxidative stress in the brain.