Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

The Effects of Solar Disinfection on Childhood Diarrhea Rates in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review.

Poster Number

78

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Masters

Abstract Category

Global Health

Keywords

Solar disinfection; SODIS; children; diarrhea; Africa

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Solar disinfection (SODIS) provides a cheap, quick, and effective way to disinfect water in low and middle income countries (LMIC). Lack of access to clean drinking water makes the residents of these nations, in particular children, highly susceptible to contracting and potentially dying from diarrheal disease. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), diarrheal disease is the second leading cause of death in children under 5 years old and kills close to 800,000 children yearly. Death due to diarrheal disease is preventable. If implemented and used properly, SODIS can reduce the incidence of diarrheal disease and subsequent death in many low and middle income countries.

Methods

A systematic review was conducted following PRISMA guidelines. Searches were conducted via Pubmed, SCOPUS, OVID, and Engineering Village databases. Searches were limited to papers published between 1996 and 2016, and were reviewed by the author to provide an analysis of content. A total of 141 publications were initially retrieved, 11 full text reviews of publications were completed, 6 publications were included in the systematic literature review.

Results

SODIS is an effective way of disinfecting water. All of the studies included in the systematic review found that when SODIS was implemented, incidence of diarrhea decreased significantly. Results also showed that SODIS can be effectively used during a cholera outbreak to prevent disease spread and death due to diarrheal dehydration.

Conclusions

All of the literature included in the review showed that SODIS is an adequate intervention and can be used in lower and middle income countries in order to reduce diarrheal disease transmission and diarrhea associated deaths.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

Poster to be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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The Effects of Solar Disinfection on Childhood Diarrhea Rates in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review.

Solar disinfection (SODIS) provides a cheap, quick, and effective way to disinfect water in low and middle income countries (LMIC). Lack of access to clean drinking water makes the residents of these nations, in particular children, highly susceptible to contracting and potentially dying from diarrheal disease. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), diarrheal disease is the second leading cause of death in children under 5 years old and kills close to 800,000 children yearly. Death due to diarrheal disease is preventable. If implemented and used properly, SODIS can reduce the incidence of diarrheal disease and subsequent death in many low and middle income countries.

Methods

A systematic review was conducted following PRISMA guidelines. Searches were conducted via Pubmed, SCOPUS, OVID, and Engineering Village databases. Searches were limited to papers published between 1996 and 2016, and were reviewed by the author to provide an analysis of content. A total of 141 publications were initially retrieved, 11 full text reviews of publications were completed, 6 publications were included in the systematic literature review.

Results

SODIS is an effective way of disinfecting water. All of the studies included in the systematic review found that when SODIS was implemented, incidence of diarrhea decreased significantly. Results also showed that SODIS can be effectively used during a cholera outbreak to prevent disease spread and death due to diarrheal dehydration.

Conclusions

All of the literature included in the review showed that SODIS is an adequate intervention and can be used in lower and middle income countries in order to reduce diarrheal disease transmission and diarrhea associated deaths.