Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

AI/AN Children with Asthma or Respiratory-Related Illness and Exposure to Household Air Pollution in North America: A Systematic Review

Poster Number

34

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Masters

Abstract Category

Environmental and Occupational Health

Keywords

Native American; Household Air Pollution; Children; Asthma; Air Quality

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

The impact of household air quality on asthma or respiratory disease development remains unclear. Asthma is the most common chronic disease in children and acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children globally. AI/AN children are a population identified as living with a high prevalence of asthma, an estimated 13.3%, compared to children in different racial groups within the United States. This study examined all relevant human data evaluating a link between household air pollution exposure and development of asthma or respiratory-related illnesses (RRI). The examination of relevant data meant to evaluate household air pollution exposure and disease development among a Native or Indigenous population for a possible association. The study identified and reviewed relevant epidemiologic study articles from 1950 to 2016 using a database search algorithm. Each study was reviewed by quality and bias assessment criteria and pertinent data extracted. 11 articles were identified, reviewed, and analyzed. There is evidence in epidemiologic studies that increased exposure to household air pollutants is associated with asthma and RRI. However, study design and exposure measurements within the studies fitting inclusion criteria were highly varied and most used small samples of convenience; therefore, this study could not adequately determine an association between household air pollution and asthma among the AI/AN population. The research did determine a deficiency of community-based participatory research practices within the study populations, as well as evidence-based exposure assessments. Additional studies are needed to examine the effects of household air pollution within this population. In addition to rural locations, urban environments must be assessed for AI/AN asthma risk factors. Conducting high quality, community-based participatory research practices must be utilized when working with AI/AN communities; this is imperative to produce replicable data necessary to enhance the health of this marginalized population.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

Poster to be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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AI/AN Children with Asthma or Respiratory-Related Illness and Exposure to Household Air Pollution in North America: A Systematic Review

The impact of household air quality on asthma or respiratory disease development remains unclear. Asthma is the most common chronic disease in children and acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children globally. AI/AN children are a population identified as living with a high prevalence of asthma, an estimated 13.3%, compared to children in different racial groups within the United States. This study examined all relevant human data evaluating a link between household air pollution exposure and development of asthma or respiratory-related illnesses (RRI). The examination of relevant data meant to evaluate household air pollution exposure and disease development among a Native or Indigenous population for a possible association. The study identified and reviewed relevant epidemiologic study articles from 1950 to 2016 using a database search algorithm. Each study was reviewed by quality and bias assessment criteria and pertinent data extracted. 11 articles were identified, reviewed, and analyzed. There is evidence in epidemiologic studies that increased exposure to household air pollutants is associated with asthma and RRI. However, study design and exposure measurements within the studies fitting inclusion criteria were highly varied and most used small samples of convenience; therefore, this study could not adequately determine an association between household air pollution and asthma among the AI/AN population. The research did determine a deficiency of community-based participatory research practices within the study populations, as well as evidence-based exposure assessments. Additional studies are needed to examine the effects of household air pollution within this population. In addition to rural locations, urban environments must be assessed for AI/AN asthma risk factors. Conducting high quality, community-based participatory research practices must be utilized when working with AI/AN communities; this is imperative to produce replicable data necessary to enhance the health of this marginalized population.