Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Uric Acid in Sugar Cane Workers in Nicaragua

Poster Number

79

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Masters

Abstract Category

Global Health

Keywords

Chronic kidney disease; Nicaragua; Mesoamerican Nephropathy; Uric acid; hyperuricemia; Sugar cane; cane cutter.

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Background: A significant increase in Chronic Kidney Disease of unknown etiology in persons 20-40 persists in Nicaragua and El Salvador despite 15 years of research. The disease is known as Mesoamerican Nephropathy (MeN). Men and women have early morbidity and mortality from this disease, however this study focuses on males, as it disproportionately affects them. One possible etiology that is lacking in studies is elevated uric acid among field workers on sugarcane farms. Objective: Characterize prevalence of hyperuricemia and changes in uric acid among field workers. Methods: Measured biomarkers of uric acid were used to create dichotomous uric acid variables. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate prevalence odds ratios for field work, dichotomous hyperuricemia and dichotomous years worked at ISA. Results: In this population the CKD prevalence was 33% with low hematuria and low proteinuria, which is similar to other MeN studies.. There was an increased odds of hyperuricemia of 1.3 for those that ever worked in the field as a cane cutter and/or irrigator versus those who had not. There was an increased odds of having multiple episodes of hyperuricemia of 7.9 for those who worked in a field vs those who did not. Conclusion: There appears to be an association between field workers and hyperuricemia and incidents of hyperuricemia, which could be a precursor to MeN.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

Poster to be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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Uric Acid in Sugar Cane Workers in Nicaragua

Background: A significant increase in Chronic Kidney Disease of unknown etiology in persons 20-40 persists in Nicaragua and El Salvador despite 15 years of research. The disease is known as Mesoamerican Nephropathy (MeN). Men and women have early morbidity and mortality from this disease, however this study focuses on males, as it disproportionately affects them. One possible etiology that is lacking in studies is elevated uric acid among field workers on sugarcane farms. Objective: Characterize prevalence of hyperuricemia and changes in uric acid among field workers. Methods: Measured biomarkers of uric acid were used to create dichotomous uric acid variables. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate prevalence odds ratios for field work, dichotomous hyperuricemia and dichotomous years worked at ISA. Results: In this population the CKD prevalence was 33% with low hematuria and low proteinuria, which is similar to other MeN studies.. There was an increased odds of hyperuricemia of 1.3 for those that ever worked in the field as a cane cutter and/or irrigator versus those who had not. There was an increased odds of having multiple episodes of hyperuricemia of 7.9 for those who worked in a field vs those who did not. Conclusion: There appears to be an association between field workers and hyperuricemia and incidents of hyperuricemia, which could be a precursor to MeN.