Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Sex-Differences and Interactions in Head Injuries and Concussions among Collegiate Soccer Players: NCAA ISP, 2004-2009

Poster Number

54

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Doctoral

Abstract Category

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Keywords

Injury Epidemiology; Football (soccer); Head injuries; NCAA; ISP

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Introduction: Some of the highest rates of head injuries and concussion among all contact/collision sports are observed in soccer; yet, the multifactorial determinants of head injuries among players remain relatively undefined. We extend previous analyses and examine sex-differences in the rate and the severity (concussion and lost days of participation) of head injuries among collegiate soccer players between 2004 and 2009.

Methods: Data were analyzed from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance Program (ISP). Multivariable logistic regression and negative binomial regression modeling tested the relation between sex and head injury outcomes, while controlling for contact, setting, and competition level, as well as their joint effects.

Results: Between 2004 and 2009, the sex-specific rate of soccer-related head injuries was 0.87 per 1000 AEs in women and 0.71 per 1000 AEs in men (RR = 1.23, 95% CI = [1.08, 1.41]). The rate of head injuries due to player-to-player contact was comparable between women and men (RR=0.95, 95% CI=[0.81, 1.11]); however, the rate of injury due to contact with apparatus (ball/goal) was nearly 2 ½ -fold higher (RR=2.46, 95% CI = [1.76, 3.44]) and the rate due to contact with a playing surface was over two-fold higher (RR=2.29, 95% CI = [1.34, 3.91]) in women than in men. We also observed a significant joint effect between sex and contact in our regression models.

Conclusions: Among female players, head contact with a ball, a goal post, or the playing surface may be especially deleterious compared with head contact with another player.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

To be presented at GW Research Days 2017.

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Sex-Differences and Interactions in Head Injuries and Concussions among Collegiate Soccer Players: NCAA ISP, 2004-2009

Introduction: Some of the highest rates of head injuries and concussion among all contact/collision sports are observed in soccer; yet, the multifactorial determinants of head injuries among players remain relatively undefined. We extend previous analyses and examine sex-differences in the rate and the severity (concussion and lost days of participation) of head injuries among collegiate soccer players between 2004 and 2009.

Methods: Data were analyzed from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance Program (ISP). Multivariable logistic regression and negative binomial regression modeling tested the relation between sex and head injury outcomes, while controlling for contact, setting, and competition level, as well as their joint effects.

Results: Between 2004 and 2009, the sex-specific rate of soccer-related head injuries was 0.87 per 1000 AEs in women and 0.71 per 1000 AEs in men (RR = 1.23, 95% CI = [1.08, 1.41]). The rate of head injuries due to player-to-player contact was comparable between women and men (RR=0.95, 95% CI=[0.81, 1.11]); however, the rate of injury due to contact with apparatus (ball/goal) was nearly 2 ½ -fold higher (RR=2.46, 95% CI = [1.76, 3.44]) and the rate due to contact with a playing surface was over two-fold higher (RR=2.29, 95% CI = [1.34, 3.91]) in women than in men. We also observed a significant joint effect between sex and contact in our regression models.

Conclusions: Among female players, head contact with a ball, a goal post, or the playing surface may be especially deleterious compared with head contact with another player.