Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Polytobacco Use Among Metropolitan and Non-Metropolitan Adolescents: A Latent Class Analysis

Poster Number

59

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Masters

Abstract Category

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Keywords

polytobacco use; metropolitan status; high-school students polytobacco use; epidemiology; latent class analysis

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Significance. In recent years, the number of tobacco products on the market has increased, as well as the number of youth reporting the use of more than one tobacco product (i.e., polytobacco use). Studies conducted in the past have shown differences in polytobacco use between demographic groups, such as sex and age. However, no studies have examined polytobacco use comparing metropolitan and non-metropolitan adolescents.

Methods. Data from the 2014 Florida Youth Tobacco Survey were analyzed to assess patterns of tobacco product use by metropolitan and non-metropolitan youth. Participants who were in high school (grades 9-12) and aged 14-17 were included in the analysis (n=28,045). Rural urban continuum codes used to classify residence.

Results. Overall, 12% of participants reported polytobacco use in the past 30 days (n=3,300). Polytobacco use was more commonly reported among youth living in non-metropolitan than metropolitan areas (14.1% versus 10.3%; Chi-square=35.31, plt;0.01). Latent class analysis was used to examine polytobacco use separately among metropolitan and non-metropolitan youth, controlling for sex, age and race/ethnicity. Past 30 day use of seven tobacco products were examined: (1) cigarettes, (2) chewing tobacco, snuff, or dip, (3) cigars, cigarillos, or little cigars, (4) bidis, kreteks, or tobacco in a pipe, (5) hookah, (6) snus, and (7) e-cigarettes. A five factor solution was identified as the best solution for both groups, but class structure and distribution across five classes differed by metropolitan status. For metropolitan youth, the main products that defined each class were (1) combustibles (35%), (2) smokeless tobacco (21.5%), (3) cigarette & e-cigarette (16.3%), (4) all products (13.8%), and (5) hookah and e-cigarettes (13.3%). In contrast, the main products defining the five classes for non-metropolitan youth were (1) cigars and hookah (31.6%), (2) hookah and e-cigarettes (28.3%), (3) cigarettes and e-cigarettes (16.7%), (4) all products (16.2%), and (5) cigarettes and cigars (7.2%).

Conclusions. Polytobacco use is more prevalent among non-metropolitan youth than metropolitan youth, and product use patterns vary among these two groups. Understanding how tobacco products are used together will be critical for the development of interventions designed to reduce polytobacco use. The present findings suggest that interventions to address polytobacco use among youth may need to be tailored to the different polytobacco use patterns by metropolitan status.

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Poster to be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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Polytobacco Use Among Metropolitan and Non-Metropolitan Adolescents: A Latent Class Analysis

Significance. In recent years, the number of tobacco products on the market has increased, as well as the number of youth reporting the use of more than one tobacco product (i.e., polytobacco use). Studies conducted in the past have shown differences in polytobacco use between demographic groups, such as sex and age. However, no studies have examined polytobacco use comparing metropolitan and non-metropolitan adolescents.

Methods. Data from the 2014 Florida Youth Tobacco Survey were analyzed to assess patterns of tobacco product use by metropolitan and non-metropolitan youth. Participants who were in high school (grades 9-12) and aged 14-17 were included in the analysis (n=28,045). Rural urban continuum codes used to classify residence.

Results. Overall, 12% of participants reported polytobacco use in the past 30 days (n=3,300). Polytobacco use was more commonly reported among youth living in non-metropolitan than metropolitan areas (14.1% versus 10.3%; Chi-square=35.31, plt;0.01). Latent class analysis was used to examine polytobacco use separately among metropolitan and non-metropolitan youth, controlling for sex, age and race/ethnicity. Past 30 day use of seven tobacco products were examined: (1) cigarettes, (2) chewing tobacco, snuff, or dip, (3) cigars, cigarillos, or little cigars, (4) bidis, kreteks, or tobacco in a pipe, (5) hookah, (6) snus, and (7) e-cigarettes. A five factor solution was identified as the best solution for both groups, but class structure and distribution across five classes differed by metropolitan status. For metropolitan youth, the main products that defined each class were (1) combustibles (35%), (2) smokeless tobacco (21.5%), (3) cigarette & e-cigarette (16.3%), (4) all products (13.8%), and (5) hookah and e-cigarettes (13.3%). In contrast, the main products defining the five classes for non-metropolitan youth were (1) cigars and hookah (31.6%), (2) hookah and e-cigarettes (28.3%), (3) cigarettes and e-cigarettes (16.7%), (4) all products (16.2%), and (5) cigarettes and cigars (7.2%).

Conclusions. Polytobacco use is more prevalent among non-metropolitan youth than metropolitan youth, and product use patterns vary among these two groups. Understanding how tobacco products are used together will be critical for the development of interventions designed to reduce polytobacco use. The present findings suggest that interventions to address polytobacco use among youth may need to be tailored to the different polytobacco use patterns by metropolitan status.