Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Combatting Maternal Mortality: Analyzing the Three Delay Model to Provide Maternal Care in Remote Regions

Poster Number

74

Document Type

Poster

Status

Undergraduate Student

Abstract Category

Global Health

Keywords

Maternal mortality; three delay model; accessibility; remote regions

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

The world has made significant strides in reducing maternal mortality globally, but it remains a debilitating problem in the most remote regions, which have little access to safe and adequate medical facilities and cannot be easily reached via roads. This study focused on the Three Delay model, which outlines the factors that result in maternal mortalities given that most occur because of delays in receiving proper treatment during a pregnancy (i.e. delays in deciding to seek medical assistance, reaching the nearest medical facility, and receiving appropriate and timely treatment). This study attempts to widen the research on (1) the biggest challenges to lowering maternal mortality in remote regions, (2) initiatives countries are taking to improve the situation and if they've been successful, and lastly (3) innovative technology to improve access to maternal health care in these regions. Data was collected by reviewing secondary sources and interviewing academics, local non-profit leaders, and members of UN organizations, including the Director-General of the World Health Organization. The countries of focus were Nigeria, India, and Bangladesh. This study found that the biggest challenges for the average woman in these countries to carry out a successful pregnancy were lack of healthcare personnel, shortage of well-functioning equipment, and unreliable sources of electricity and water. These countries have created programs to train midwives to respond to complications, provide transportation in the most unreachable areas, and communicate with doctors in other parts of the country through the use of telemedicine. There is still much work to be done but through new innovations and initiatives by governments with the goal of women's empowerment, easily avoidable complications no longer need to lead to fatalities, and millions of children can know their mothers.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

Poster to be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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Combatting Maternal Mortality: Analyzing the Three Delay Model to Provide Maternal Care in Remote Regions

The world has made significant strides in reducing maternal mortality globally, but it remains a debilitating problem in the most remote regions, which have little access to safe and adequate medical facilities and cannot be easily reached via roads. This study focused on the Three Delay model, which outlines the factors that result in maternal mortalities given that most occur because of delays in receiving proper treatment during a pregnancy (i.e. delays in deciding to seek medical assistance, reaching the nearest medical facility, and receiving appropriate and timely treatment). This study attempts to widen the research on (1) the biggest challenges to lowering maternal mortality in remote regions, (2) initiatives countries are taking to improve the situation and if they've been successful, and lastly (3) innovative technology to improve access to maternal health care in these regions. Data was collected by reviewing secondary sources and interviewing academics, local non-profit leaders, and members of UN organizations, including the Director-General of the World Health Organization. The countries of focus were Nigeria, India, and Bangladesh. This study found that the biggest challenges for the average woman in these countries to carry out a successful pregnancy were lack of healthcare personnel, shortage of well-functioning equipment, and unreliable sources of electricity and water. These countries have created programs to train midwives to respond to complications, provide transportation in the most unreachable areas, and communicate with doctors in other parts of the country through the use of telemedicine. There is still much work to be done but through new innovations and initiatives by governments with the goal of women's empowerment, easily avoidable complications no longer need to lead to fatalities, and millions of children can know their mothers.