Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

The Economic Burden of Malaria Cases Imported from Hispaniola to other Non- Endemic Countries in the Western Hemisphere (2007- 2013)

Poster Number

63

Document Type

Poster

Status

Recent Alumni

Abstract Category

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Keywords

Hispaniola; Malaria; Cost; Burden; DALY

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Background / Objectives: Hispaniola is the only island endemic for malaria in the Caribbean region. Widening income disparity and natural disasters have hindered malaria control. Routine travel between Hispaniola and other non- endemic countries in the western hemisphere could pose a risk for the re-introduction of malaria in non-endemic countries. Given the paucity of information on the cost of imported cases to non-endemic countries in the Americas, this study sought to estimate the cost and evaluate the economic burden of malaria cases imported from Hispaniola to non-endemic countries in Americas.

Methods: Epidemiologic data on imported malaria cases came from reports from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Agency of Canada, the Canadian Malaria Network, the World Health Organization and the Pan American Health Organization. Calculation of costs per disability adjusted life-year (DALY), were based upon the WHO burden of disease estimates of DALY loss due to malaria in non-endemic countries in Americas, and the costs of diagnosis and treatment of malaria.

Results: During 2007-2013, the estimated number of malaria cases, imported from Hispaniola, to non-endemic countries in North America ranged between 30 and 192. Disease management costs varied between $100,018 and $1,229,320; the Cost/DALY range was $121,377 to $1,079,557. Between 2011 and 2013, 24 cases from Haiti reported in non-endemic Caribbean Islands; they cost $53,076, with no loss of DALY reported.

Conclusion: Understanding the economic and human impact of malaria on endemic countries as well as on their non-endemic neighbors helps strengthen the case for worldwide malaria elimination.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

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Poster to be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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The Economic Burden of Malaria Cases Imported from Hispaniola to other Non- Endemic Countries in the Western Hemisphere (2007- 2013)

Background / Objectives: Hispaniola is the only island endemic for malaria in the Caribbean region. Widening income disparity and natural disasters have hindered malaria control. Routine travel between Hispaniola and other non- endemic countries in the western hemisphere could pose a risk for the re-introduction of malaria in non-endemic countries. Given the paucity of information on the cost of imported cases to non-endemic countries in the Americas, this study sought to estimate the cost and evaluate the economic burden of malaria cases imported from Hispaniola to non-endemic countries in Americas.

Methods: Epidemiologic data on imported malaria cases came from reports from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Agency of Canada, the Canadian Malaria Network, the World Health Organization and the Pan American Health Organization. Calculation of costs per disability adjusted life-year (DALY), were based upon the WHO burden of disease estimates of DALY loss due to malaria in non-endemic countries in Americas, and the costs of diagnosis and treatment of malaria.

Results: During 2007-2013, the estimated number of malaria cases, imported from Hispaniola, to non-endemic countries in North America ranged between 30 and 192. Disease management costs varied between $100,018 and $1,229,320; the Cost/DALY range was $121,377 to $1,079,557. Between 2011 and 2013, 24 cases from Haiti reported in non-endemic Caribbean Islands; they cost $53,076, with no loss of DALY reported.

Conclusion: Understanding the economic and human impact of malaria on endemic countries as well as on their non-endemic neighbors helps strengthen the case for worldwide malaria elimination.