Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Systematic Review of Associations Between Particulate Matter (PM2.5 PM10) and Cancer Risk

Poster Number

29

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Masters

Abstract Category

Environmental and Occupational Health

Keywords

Lung cancer incidence/mortality; particulate matter; air pollution

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Background: Particulate matter is a combination of solid and liquid particles suspended in air, and can contain dust, pollen, smoke, and other chemicals. Many studies have investigated a potentially deleterious effect on lung health as a result of PM2.5 and PM10. _x000D_

Objective: To review and investigate the association between particulate matter exposures (PM2.5 and PM10) and lung cancer, and the strength of the exposure.

Methods: We included the first several steps of the Navigation Guide methodology and developed a PICOS/PECOS statement. We then searched for articles that fit our search criteria that illustrating a comprehensive overview of research pertaining to lung cancer incidence/mortality and PM2.5 and PM10 exposures.

Results: We identified 9 studies that met our inclusion criteria and 6 were included in this study. These studies found PM2.5 and PM10 exposures increase the risk of lung cancer incidence and/or mortality from 1.16-1.274,5,7,8,10, and one study found an OR of 3.306 for the high frequency of cooking and 4.086 for solid fuel usage for cooking. None of the studies concluded that there was little to no effect on lung cancer incidence while the others found significant hazard and odd ratios for the relationship between PM2.5 and PM10.

Conclusion: Based on the review of these articles, we concluded that these studies suggest PM2.5 and PM10 have a moderate increase in the risk of incidence and mortality of lung cancer.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

Poster to be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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Systematic Review of Associations Between Particulate Matter (PM2.5 PM10) and Cancer Risk

Background: Particulate matter is a combination of solid and liquid particles suspended in air, and can contain dust, pollen, smoke, and other chemicals. Many studies have investigated a potentially deleterious effect on lung health as a result of PM2.5 and PM10. _x000D_

Objective: To review and investigate the association between particulate matter exposures (PM2.5 and PM10) and lung cancer, and the strength of the exposure.

Methods: We included the first several steps of the Navigation Guide methodology and developed a PICOS/PECOS statement. We then searched for articles that fit our search criteria that illustrating a comprehensive overview of research pertaining to lung cancer incidence/mortality and PM2.5 and PM10 exposures.

Results: We identified 9 studies that met our inclusion criteria and 6 were included in this study. These studies found PM2.5 and PM10 exposures increase the risk of lung cancer incidence and/or mortality from 1.16-1.274,5,7,8,10, and one study found an OR of 3.306 for the high frequency of cooking and 4.086 for solid fuel usage for cooking. None of the studies concluded that there was little to no effect on lung cancer incidence while the others found significant hazard and odd ratios for the relationship between PM2.5 and PM10.

Conclusion: Based on the review of these articles, we concluded that these studies suggest PM2.5 and PM10 have a moderate increase in the risk of incidence and mortality of lung cancer.