Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Persons Receiving Housing Rental Assistance in the U.S., 2006-2012

Poster Number

60

Document Type

Poster

Status

Recent Alumni

Abstract Category

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Keywords

housing; cvd; chronic disease; housing assistance; HUD

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND: High blood pressure, obesity, and diabetes are among the major risk factors that lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death in the U.S. There is little available information about how the prevalence of CVD risk factors differs among low-income persons receiving housing rental assistance compared to those unassisted, and whether housing assistance positively impacts health outcomes.

METHODS: The National Center for Health Statistics and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development linked administrative data with health survey data from the National Health Interview Survey. This study sought to analyze select cardiometabolic CVD risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, and obesity among a national sample of HUD assisted low-income renting adults 2006-2012 (n=2,834) compared to unassisted low-income renting adults (n=7,166).

RESULTS: HUD assisted low-income renting adults have 25% greater odds (AOR=1.25 [95% CI 1.034, 1.522]) of having ever been told by a healthcare provider they have diabetes, 10% greater odds (AOR=1.10 [95% CI 0.943, 1.272]) of being told they have hypertension, and 27% greater odds (AOR=1.27 [95% CI 1.101, 1.462]) of being obese (BMI≥30) than the unassisted adults, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics.

CONCLUSIONS: HUD assisted low-income renting adults have greater odds of having ever been told by a doctor they have the selected CVD risk factors, offering insight into the chronic health condition of households receiving HUD assistance and suggesting further research on the uniqueness of individuals who receive HUD assistance.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

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Comments

Poster to be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Persons Receiving Housing Rental Assistance in the U.S., 2006-2012

BACKGROUND: High blood pressure, obesity, and diabetes are among the major risk factors that lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death in the U.S. There is little available information about how the prevalence of CVD risk factors differs among low-income persons receiving housing rental assistance compared to those unassisted, and whether housing assistance positively impacts health outcomes.

METHODS: The National Center for Health Statistics and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development linked administrative data with health survey data from the National Health Interview Survey. This study sought to analyze select cardiometabolic CVD risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, and obesity among a national sample of HUD assisted low-income renting adults 2006-2012 (n=2,834) compared to unassisted low-income renting adults (n=7,166).

RESULTS: HUD assisted low-income renting adults have 25% greater odds (AOR=1.25 [95% CI 1.034, 1.522]) of having ever been told by a healthcare provider they have diabetes, 10% greater odds (AOR=1.10 [95% CI 0.943, 1.272]) of being told they have hypertension, and 27% greater odds (AOR=1.27 [95% CI 1.101, 1.462]) of being obese (BMI≥30) than the unassisted adults, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics.

CONCLUSIONS: HUD assisted low-income renting adults have greater odds of having ever been told by a doctor they have the selected CVD risk factors, offering insight into the chronic health condition of households receiving HUD assistance and suggesting further research on the uniqueness of individuals who receive HUD assistance.