Department of Biomedical Engineering Posters and Presentations

Title

Hidden Bleed Ultrasound Phantom

Document Type

Poster

Keywords

Ultrasound; Phantom; pseudoaneurysm; trauma; sonography

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

Every year, GW hospital treats 300 gunshot wound victims and, per protocol, doctors and nurses will calculate a patient’s ankle brachial index (ABI) to determine whether or not the injuries sustained by the lower extremities require surgery to repair any internal bleeding. If a patient scores a 0.9 or above on the ABI, they are further examined for damage to the vasculature of their legs. However, patients that score closely to a 0.9 are prematurely sent home from hospitals because their ABI score is within the normal range but post injury internal bleeding can be extremely slow and not affect the ABI value. This is dangerous since their internal bleedings injuries can worsen and have to seek treatment again. Our group proposes using ultrasound as a diagnostic tool to detect internal pseudoaneurysms if a patient scores close to a 0.9 on the ABI. To test the effectiveness of ultrasound in pseudoaneurysm detection, we are developing a tissue ultrasound phantom of the leg with a femoral artery to test ultrasound in this application. We are going to create and develop multiple leg tissue phantoms with femoral arteries, which consist of the same acoustic properties of real tissue and blood. Then, we will mimic different potential gunshot induced pseudoaneurysm scenarios on these phantoms to observe their effects. The phantom will be attached to a peristaltic pump to facilitate blood flow and a pressure sensor will collect data which will allow the maximum and minimum pressures within the artery, ABI and BPM to be calculated via a microcontroller. After ultrasound imaging is performed on the phantom, the image is analyzed using ImageJ and the pseudoaneurysm can be detected and measured. When the femoral artery is punctured, we expect to see the blood mimicking fluid slowly ooze from the puncture site and pool around the artery within the gel. The gel and blood mimicking fluid will contain a similar acoustic attenuation to real blood and soft tissue. This will prove that the gels are biomimetic and can be used in future research to study sonography and produce an algorithm that self detects trauma induced pseudoaneurysms while minimizing the user variability associated with ultrasound in clinical settings.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

To be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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Hidden Bleed Ultrasound Phantom

Every year, GW hospital treats 300 gunshot wound victims and, per protocol, doctors and nurses will calculate a patient’s ankle brachial index (ABI) to determine whether or not the injuries sustained by the lower extremities require surgery to repair any internal bleeding. If a patient scores a 0.9 or above on the ABI, they are further examined for damage to the vasculature of their legs. However, patients that score closely to a 0.9 are prematurely sent home from hospitals because their ABI score is within the normal range but post injury internal bleeding can be extremely slow and not affect the ABI value. This is dangerous since their internal bleedings injuries can worsen and have to seek treatment again. Our group proposes using ultrasound as a diagnostic tool to detect internal pseudoaneurysms if a patient scores close to a 0.9 on the ABI. To test the effectiveness of ultrasound in pseudoaneurysm detection, we are developing a tissue ultrasound phantom of the leg with a femoral artery to test ultrasound in this application. We are going to create and develop multiple leg tissue phantoms with femoral arteries, which consist of the same acoustic properties of real tissue and blood. Then, we will mimic different potential gunshot induced pseudoaneurysm scenarios on these phantoms to observe their effects. The phantom will be attached to a peristaltic pump to facilitate blood flow and a pressure sensor will collect data which will allow the maximum and minimum pressures within the artery, ABI and BPM to be calculated via a microcontroller. After ultrasound imaging is performed on the phantom, the image is analyzed using ImageJ and the pseudoaneurysm can be detected and measured. When the femoral artery is punctured, we expect to see the blood mimicking fluid slowly ooze from the puncture site and pool around the artery within the gel. The gel and blood mimicking fluid will contain a similar acoustic attenuation to real blood and soft tissue. This will prove that the gels are biomimetic and can be used in future research to study sonography and produce an algorithm that self detects trauma induced pseudoaneurysms while minimizing the user variability associated with ultrasound in clinical settings.