Department of Biomedical Engineering Posters and Presentations

Title

Effects of 3D Printing on Viability and Proliferation Rates of Primary Cardiac Fibroblasts

Document Type

Poster

Keywords

Tissue engineering; 3D Bioprinting; Cardiac fibroblasts; Viability

Publication Date

4-2017

Abstract

In the fields of cell biology and tissue engineering, 3D printing has quickly become a popular and effective method for controlling cell growth and generating a complex biomimetic environment. However, there are still significant concerns that bioprinters decrease cell viability due to heat and mechanical stresses on cells when printed. Many in the field have shown that precise cell placement, complex arrangement, and incorporation of a variety of cell types can be achieved in 3D printed constructs. Yet, there is still a need for effective ways to accurately measure cell viability and behavior in real time. To address these issues, we compared the viability of primary cardiac fibroblasts and their survival in multiple passages before and after an extrusion-based 3D printing process, using methods new to this field. The goal was to set a standard of accurate and highly responsive assessment of cell behavior in 3D printed constructs, both short and long term. Analysis of cell viability was conducted with microscopy, immunocytochemistry, and bioluminescence imaging with Luciferin and CytoscanTM LDH assays. To evaluate the effect of the 3D printing process on cell proliferation and viability, 3D printed live cell constructs were compared to cells cultured in monolayers over three sequential passages. 3D constructs were designed in SolidWorks as a thin 15mm diameter disk intended to fit on a 25mm coverslip. A single construct holds approximately 100K cells after printing. A BioBot 3D bioprinter was used to print cell laden BioGel, a cell printing material that is photocured using visible blue light. Future directions of this work include assessment of 3D printed constructs with different and multiple cell types, multi-layered tissue constructs, and different biocompatible materials.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

To be presented at GW Annual Research Days 2017.

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Effects of 3D Printing on Viability and Proliferation Rates of Primary Cardiac Fibroblasts

In the fields of cell biology and tissue engineering, 3D printing has quickly become a popular and effective method for controlling cell growth and generating a complex biomimetic environment. However, there are still significant concerns that bioprinters decrease cell viability due to heat and mechanical stresses on cells when printed. Many in the field have shown that precise cell placement, complex arrangement, and incorporation of a variety of cell types can be achieved in 3D printed constructs. Yet, there is still a need for effective ways to accurately measure cell viability and behavior in real time. To address these issues, we compared the viability of primary cardiac fibroblasts and their survival in multiple passages before and after an extrusion-based 3D printing process, using methods new to this field. The goal was to set a standard of accurate and highly responsive assessment of cell behavior in 3D printed constructs, both short and long term. Analysis of cell viability was conducted with microscopy, immunocytochemistry, and bioluminescence imaging with Luciferin and CytoscanTM LDH assays. To evaluate the effect of the 3D printing process on cell proliferation and viability, 3D printed live cell constructs were compared to cells cultured in monolayers over three sequential passages. 3D constructs were designed in SolidWorks as a thin 15mm diameter disk intended to fit on a 25mm coverslip. A single construct holds approximately 100K cells after printing. A BioBot 3D bioprinter was used to print cell laden BioGel, a cell printing material that is photocured using visible blue light. Future directions of this work include assessment of 3D printed constructs with different and multiple cell types, multi-layered tissue constructs, and different biocompatible materials.