School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Poster Number

167

Document Type

Poster

Publication Date

3-2016

Abstract

Studies on the pathophysiology and comorbidities associated with alopecia areata (AA) are limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of androgen excess in AA and its subtypes, in relation to demographics and comorbidities. Medical records of 1,587 Patchy AA, AT, AU, and ophiasis patients seen in the Department of Dermatology at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Ohio between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed. Out of this cohort, 226 patients met the inclusion criteria. There is evidence that patients with AA had significantly greater prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) than the general population (p<0.001). Androgen excess was identified in 42.5% (n=96) of the 226 patients with AA or any subtype (p<0.001). The androgen excess group was significantly more likely to present with irregular menses, hirsutism, adult acne, PCOS, and/or ovarian cysts (p<0.001). This study was limited by being retrospective. Our study demonstrated that AA is associated with androgen excess.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at: GW Research Days 2016

 

Is Androgen Excess Masked in Alopecia Areata Patients: A Retrospective Data Analysis of 1,587 Patients

Studies on the pathophysiology and comorbidities associated with alopecia areata (AA) are limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of androgen excess in AA and its subtypes, in relation to demographics and comorbidities. Medical records of 1,587 Patchy AA, AT, AU, and ophiasis patients seen in the Department of Dermatology at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Ohio between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed. Out of this cohort, 226 patients met the inclusion criteria. There is evidence that patients with AA had significantly greater prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) than the general population (p<0.001). Androgen excess was identified in 42.5% (n=96) of the 226 patients with AA or any subtype (p<0.001). The androgen excess group was significantly more likely to present with irregular menses, hirsutism, adult acne, PCOS, and/or ovarian cysts (p<0.001). This study was limited by being retrospective. Our study demonstrated that AA is associated with androgen excess.

 

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