School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Fat Mass Is a Better Predictor of Cardiovascular Disease Risk than Biochemical Parameters in a Type 2 Diabetes Population

Poster Number

157

Document Type

Poster

Publication Date

3-2016

Abstract

Endothelial dysfunction, leading to vascular complication, is a major concern in a type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and obese population. Arterial stiffness is an established predictor of endothelial health and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Arterial stiffness is commonly measured by two tonometry based tests: pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA), which provide the values of Augmentation index-75 (AI-75) and Augmentation Pressure (AP). Serum biochemistries are also used to monitor disease progression. In this cross-sectional study, we wanted to determine which biochemical or biophysical measure is the best overall predictor of arterial stiffness. The measures investigated were: C-Reactive Protein (CRP), IL-6, TNF-alpha, Leptin, Adiponectin, Insulin, Glucose, LDL, Non-HDL Cholesterol, BMI, Total Fat Mass, Fat Free Mass, % fat, % body water, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist/hip ratio with PWV, AI-75, and AP.

Data from 16 subjects with Diabetes Mellitus ≤ 8 years, age 40-70 years, with HbA1c 6.0 – 9.0, and a BMI of 25 – 39.9 were analyzed.

Looking at the Pearson correlation between individual biochemical and biophysical measures, and the individual measures of Arterial Stiffness (PWV, AI-75, AP), the results show that CRP is very strongly correlated to PWV (p=0.6), and moderately correlated to AP and AI-75 (p=0.44, 0.30). Leptin is found to be relatively equally well correlated to PWV, AI-75, and AP (p=0.30, 0.34, 0.30). However, when looking at a composite AS score (from standardized versions of PWV, AI-75, and AP) versus the biophysical and biochemical measures, the only measures of significance were CRP, Fat Mass, and Hip measurements. When these values were placed in a multivariate model, the only independent predictors of AS were Fat Mass (p=.018), and Hip measurements (p=0.016). When taking the numerous measures of AS into account, it is found that Fat Mass and Hip measurements were the single best predictors of arterial stiffness, even better than any of the serum biochemistry parameters. In conclusion, if we want to determine a single factor which has a the most bearing on a type 2 diabetes subjects arterial stiffness, then degree of fat mass seems to be the best predictor even better than any of the biochemical parameters. Therefore, in our study, fat mass appears to be an important indicator of CVD risk.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Presented at: GW Research Days 2016

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Fat Mass Is a Better Predictor of Cardiovascular Disease Risk than Biochemical Parameters in a Type 2 Diabetes Population

Endothelial dysfunction, leading to vascular complication, is a major concern in a type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and obese population. Arterial stiffness is an established predictor of endothelial health and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Arterial stiffness is commonly measured by two tonometry based tests: pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA), which provide the values of Augmentation index-75 (AI-75) and Augmentation Pressure (AP). Serum biochemistries are also used to monitor disease progression. In this cross-sectional study, we wanted to determine which biochemical or biophysical measure is the best overall predictor of arterial stiffness. The measures investigated were: C-Reactive Protein (CRP), IL-6, TNF-alpha, Leptin, Adiponectin, Insulin, Glucose, LDL, Non-HDL Cholesterol, BMI, Total Fat Mass, Fat Free Mass, % fat, % body water, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist/hip ratio with PWV, AI-75, and AP.

Data from 16 subjects with Diabetes Mellitus ≤ 8 years, age 40-70 years, with HbA1c 6.0 – 9.0, and a BMI of 25 – 39.9 were analyzed.

Looking at the Pearson correlation between individual biochemical and biophysical measures, and the individual measures of Arterial Stiffness (PWV, AI-75, AP), the results show that CRP is very strongly correlated to PWV (p=0.6), and moderately correlated to AP and AI-75 (p=0.44, 0.30). Leptin is found to be relatively equally well correlated to PWV, AI-75, and AP (p=0.30, 0.34, 0.30). However, when looking at a composite AS score (from standardized versions of PWV, AI-75, and AP) versus the biophysical and biochemical measures, the only measures of significance were CRP, Fat Mass, and Hip measurements. When these values were placed in a multivariate model, the only independent predictors of AS were Fat Mass (p=.018), and Hip measurements (p=0.016). When taking the numerous measures of AS into account, it is found that Fat Mass and Hip measurements were the single best predictors of arterial stiffness, even better than any of the serum biochemistry parameters. In conclusion, if we want to determine a single factor which has a the most bearing on a type 2 diabetes subjects arterial stiffness, then degree of fat mass seems to be the best predictor even better than any of the biochemical parameters. Therefore, in our study, fat mass appears to be an important indicator of CVD risk.