School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Multiple Squamous Cell Carcinomas Arising within Discoid Lupus Erythematosus Lesions in An African-American Man

Document Type

Poster

Publication Date

3-2016

Abstract

Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects the skin, particularly sun-exposed areas such as the scalp, face, and hands. Chronic inflammation and scarring results in depigmented or hypopigmented lesions, leaving the skin more vulnerable to ultraviolet exposure and malignant transformation into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The percentage of SCC arising from DLE is estimated to be 3.3-3.4%.9 Typically, SCC is managed by either surgical excision or MOHS surgery. However, quality of tissue healing must be taken into consideration as some comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, may hinder healing and therefore alter method of treatment. We present a case of a 52-year-old African-American man with multiple SCCs within DLE lesions.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at: GW Research Days 2016

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Multiple Squamous Cell Carcinomas Arising within Discoid Lupus Erythematosus Lesions in An African-American Man

Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects the skin, particularly sun-exposed areas such as the scalp, face, and hands. Chronic inflammation and scarring results in depigmented or hypopigmented lesions, leaving the skin more vulnerable to ultraviolet exposure and malignant transformation into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The percentage of SCC arising from DLE is estimated to be 3.3-3.4%.9 Typically, SCC is managed by either surgical excision or MOHS surgery. However, quality of tissue healing must be taken into consideration as some comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, may hinder healing and therefore alter method of treatment. We present a case of a 52-year-old African-American man with multiple SCCs within DLE lesions.